Württemberg Mausoleum

Untertürkheim, Germany

The Württemberg Mausoleum is a memorial standing on the peak of Württemberg Hill at the westernmost end of Schurwald woods overlooking the Neckar river. The memorial was built for Catherine Pavlovna of Russia (1788–1819), the second wife of William I of Württemberg (1781–1864). The remains of William I and his daughter Maria Friederike Charlotte of Württemberg (1816–1887) are also housed in the mausoleum.

The mausoleum was built after the death of Queen Catherine between 1820 and 1824 based on a design drafted by Giovanni Salucci. The location on the former site of Wirtemberg castle was chosen as the home of the House of Württemberg.

Between 1825 and 1899 the mausoleum was used as a Russian Orthodox Church place of worship. The memorial is still used to this day for a Russian Orthodox service every Pentecost.

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Details

Founded: 1820-1824
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Niklas Wulff (2 years ago)
An amazing place especially when it's sunny and clear view on the east of stoogy
Mitchelle Rosales (2 years ago)
Lovely place, excellent view of the city... I was in awe of the view and the environment of the place... Really beautiful
Anne Tran (3 years ago)
Gorgeous chapel. The surrounding vineyards and looking over Stuttgart is pretty great too. Beautiful place to escape from the city.
Danny R. (3 years ago)
Nice location and the hiking is worth the view! And chapel itself is really nice to see from inside and the catacombs as well. A little small for a daily visit, but a must see if you pass by over the hills and mountains! The entrance costs are a little high, but if you like stories and history, it might be worth it. Also English/German voice recorders where available!
Christian Parschau (3 years ago)
A great view over the city and surrounding vineyards. The mausoleum is a beautiful building and an interesting facet of Stuttgart history - a monument to royal love. Would definitely recommend if you have the time
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