The Stiftskirche (Collegiate Church) is the main church of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Württemberg. Structures of a small Romanesque church from the 10th and 11th centuries could recently be traced as having been exactly in today's church outline.

In 1240, a stately three-naved church with two towers was built in the Romanic style, apparently by the Counts of Württemberg who from around that time were residing in the nearby Old Castle. From the end of the 13th century a double tomb is preserved in today's South tower chapel. It contains the remains of Ulrich I, Count of Württemberg and his second wife, Countess of Württemberg, Agnes von Schlesien-Liegnitz (both died in 1265).

With Stuttgart the new residence of the rulers of Württemberg, a new Gothic chancel was built from 1321 to 1347. To it was added a Late Gothic nave in the second half of the 15th century by Ulrich V. In 1500, a coloured, later (from the 19th century) golden pulpit was added.

With the adoption of the Lutheran Protestant Reformation in Württemberg in 1534, all pictures and altars were removed from the naves, pewage and a gallery were added. The tombstones were moved to the interior of the church. From 1574, small statues of all the Counts of Württemberg (i.e. since Ulrich I) were added at the North wall of the chancel.

In 1608, a new grave crypt or burial vault was added. All of the Württemberg rulers until 1677 were buried there. Catherine Pavlovna of Russia, Queen of Württemberg from 1816 until 1819, was buried here from 1819 to 1824, before her remains were brought to a mausoleum on the Württemberg mountain.

In 1826, the roof of the chancel was renovated, as was most of the interior of the church in the 1840s.Towards the end of the Second World War, the church was heavily destroyed by the bombing raids on Stuttgart in 1944. In the 1950s, the church was restored, however, not in all historical detail.

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Founded: 1240
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko Simon (11 months ago)
I recommend to visit this if you in Stuttgart. :)
Nasir Masud (12 months ago)
One out of several sightseeing in Stuttgart, historical place, conventional design church structure, recommend to visit.
Brian Mitchell (15 months ago)
Very beautiful, historic
Yasmin Scheiber (15 months ago)
One of the oldest churches downtown Stuttgart. It's nice to go to. It has regularly events which open to public, like a religious music concert .
Angus Hamilton (16 months ago)
The church like most churches is free to visit. The church interior is quite extraordinary - it's been given effectively an ultra-modern make over which is not hinted at by the rather austere exterior. The stained glass windows are particularly lovely. The church is in central Stuttgart close the the indoor market.
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Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

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