Stuttgart New Palace

Stuttgart, Germany

The New Palace (das Neue Schloss) is built in late Baroque style. From 1746 to 1797 and from 1805 to 1807, it served as a residence of the kings of Württemberg. The palace stands adjacent to the Old Castle.

The castle was almost destroyed by Allied bombing during World War II and was reconstructed between 1958 and 1964. During this time most of the inside of the castle was also restored and the building was used by the Baden-Württemberg State Parliament. Today it is used by the State Ministries of Finance and Education. Public tours of the building are only permitted by special arrangement.

Schlossplatz is adjacent to two other popular squares in Stuttgart: Karlsplatz to the south and Schillerplatz to the south west. The former German President, Richard von Weizsäcker was born in the New Castle on April 15, 1920.

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Details

Founded: 1746
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sadra Ghorbanian (17 months ago)
Worth to visit once. Good vibes
IOAN M. (2 years ago)
Modern and nice location.
vlada perija (2 years ago)
Liveliness, and numerous cafes make this place very attractive.
vlada perija (2 years ago)
Liveliness, and numerous cafes make this place very attractive.
Nasir Masud (2 years ago)
Fantastic architectural purely European style of building, formerly known as resistance of the king of old time but now in use for government offices, situated in tourist hub, the center of Stuttgart, you can see many tourists afternoon till late night, souvenir and gift shops and restaurants are available, recommend to visit.
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