Stuttgart Cathedral

Stuttgart, Germany

Stuttgart Cathedral or St Eberhard's Cathedral has been since 1978 the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rottenburg-Stuttgart, whose main cathedral is Rottenburg Cathedral. The parish dates back to the Medieval era while the current building was completed in 1955, eleven years after it was mostly destroyed by Allied air raids in 1944.

Liudolf erected a small church around 950 and remnants of the old collegiate church were discovered under the nave of the current Cathedral. The fortunes of the Cathedral has largely been determined by the religion of the House of Württemberg, who ruled the area which comprises the present-day state Baden-Württemberg, of which Stuttgart is the capital.

In 1808, the foundation stone for the new Catholic church was laid with little fanfare. It was completed in 1811. The rectory and most of the church, along with many important buildings in the city, were destroyed during the bombing of Stuttgart in World War II in 1944.

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Details

Founded: 1955
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul O'Connor (19 months ago)
A very modern and very beautiful church. Right in the middle of Stuttgart. I often come here when I come to Stuttgart. It's a pitty I haven't been to a mass here yet. But next time.
jerome john (19 months ago)
The Chatholic church is located at the heart of the city. Very peaceful and pious place.
nygoebel (2 years ago)
Beautifully built.
Jackie Wilkinson (2 years ago)
Majestic church with a great community centre next door with books, info and refreshments sold.
Felix Peter (2 years ago)
Church in middle of crowd of Königstraße..but when you went inside the church it's pin drop silence....good church
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