Kellenried Abbey is a Benedictine monastery of women founded by the Beuronese Congregation in 1924. The first nuns came from St. Gabriel's Abbey, Bertholdstein. The abbey was named after St. Erentraud of Salzburg, first Abbess of Nonnberg Abbey in Salzburg.

The abbey church was built in 1923–24 in the Baroque Revival style by Adolf J. Lorenz. In 1926 the monastery was raised to the status of an abbey. In 1940 the nuns were expelled from the premises by the National Socialists, but returned in 1945.

The abbey owns a Baroque nativity scene, the oldest figure of which is from the 17th century, that is displayed annually from Christmas until February 2.

Apart from the traditional duties of hospitality, the nuns engage in various handicrafts and also run a shop in Kellenried where they sell nativity figures and hand-made candles.

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Details

Founded: 1924
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Weimar Republic (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Minn Knopf (14 months ago)
Als Kind durften wir uns jedes Jahr zur Adventszeit eine neue Grippenfigur in dem tollen Klosterladen raussuchen. Sehr schöne Erinnerung
Dieter König (2 years ago)
Einfach herrlich! Ein zweites "ZU HSUSE"!
Carsten Vogt (2 years ago)
Unbekannteres Benedektinerinnen-Kloster, besteht erst seit 1923/24, Gästehaus, sehr freundliche Nonne im Klosterladen, die gleich eine kleine Führung anbot; Geheimtipp der anderen Art
Ps. Neher (2 years ago)
Einfach schön dort und sehr freundlich
Juliane Loeffler (3 years ago)
Ein wunderbarer Ort der Stille, Einfachheit, des Gebets und Rückzugs. Man wird herzlich aufgenommen
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