St. Michael Abbey Ruins

Heidelberg, Germany

The Monastery of St. Michael on the Heiligenberg (Saints" Mountain), was a branch of the nearby Lorsch Abbey. The ruined complex that can be seen today was built beginning in 1023. Within the nave are traces of the Roman temple of Mercury. The monastery was abandoned in the 16th century.

The first mention of the monastery is in the Lorsch codex, from the 12th century, which dates the founding of the monastery to 870. No remains of an earlier monastery have been found, so this might have been merely an estimate of the founding.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1023
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto Montaner (4 years ago)
A very interesting archeological place. If you go by foot, it is really worth the walk. But there is also a road up to the old monastery.
Sarah Miller (4 years ago)
Quite the hike to get here if you walk the whole way, was covered in fog mid morning when I visited, though it did give the place an strange feel to it
Koeka (4 years ago)
Great walk on a hot sunny day as you are shaded by beautiful forest and easy trails.. once you arrive you are treated to a historic place mixed with the remains of a Roman temple and a midevil monestary
Ásta Eydal (4 years ago)
Supercool old Kloster. Hard to imagine that it is as old as they say. The view from up there is amazing but only in one direction because trees block the rest of the view
Mr. Wilson (4 years ago)
Coming from a place without them, it's hard to describe the experience of wandering through a ruin. Beautiful place to take photos, and surreal to set foot on the same stones monks did almost 1000 years ago. Highly recommend, and also in close proximity to a thingstätte constructed as part of the Thingspiele movement.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Medieval Walls of Avila

The city walls of Avila were built in the 11th century to protect the citizens from the Moors. They have been well maintained throughout the centuries and are now a major tourist attraction as well as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visitors can walk around about half of the length of the walls.

The layout of the city is an even quadrilateral with a perimeter of 2,516 m. Its walls, which consist in part of stones already used in earlier constructions, have an average thickness of 3 m. Access to the city is afforded by nine gates of different periods; twin 20 m high towers, linked by a semi-circular arch, flank the oldest ones, Puerta de San Vicente and Puerta del Alcázar.