Yburg Castle Ruins

Baden-Baden, Germany

Yburg Castle, built around 1200, takes its name from the outcrop that it occupies: its historical name Iberg probably derives from Eibenberg (yew-tree mountain). Of volcanic origin, the bluff towers over the Rhine valley.

The castle, its keep a highly visible landmark, marked the southwestern corner of the territory of the margraves of Baden. In the Peasants’ War of 1525, rebels invaded the castle, causing considerable damage. Because of its strategic significance, Margrave Georg Friedrich ordered that the castle be rebuilt and fortified, with work taking place between 1617 and 1620. In 1689, however, French soldiers laid waste to the structure. Like many other Medieval ruins, Yburg Castle began to attract increasing numbers of sightseers in the 19 th century. The ramparts were reinforced and partially reconstructed. Today, the ruin – and its Burggaststätte (castle inn) – is a popular destination for day-trippers, and a well-known symbol of the Rebland wine region of Baden-Baden. The restored keep offers fantastic views of the Rhine Valley and the Black Forest.

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Baden-Baden, Germany
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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ashraf Khalil (4 years ago)
Great place to watch the whole region from above
Joe Connor (4 years ago)
Beautiful panoramic views, delicious food and lovely service.
Tony W (4 years ago)
Amazing location and very good food.
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