Yburg Castle Ruins

Baden-Baden, Germany

Yburg Castle, built around 1200, takes its name from the outcrop that it occupies: its historical name Iberg probably derives from Eibenberg (yew-tree mountain). Of volcanic origin, the bluff towers over the Rhine valley.

The castle, its keep a highly visible landmark, marked the southwestern corner of the territory of the margraves of Baden. In the Peasants’ War of 1525, rebels invaded the castle, causing considerable damage. Because of its strategic significance, Margrave Georg Friedrich ordered that the castle be rebuilt and fortified, with work taking place between 1617 and 1620. In 1689, however, French soldiers laid waste to the structure. Like many other Medieval ruins, Yburg Castle began to attract increasing numbers of sightseers in the 19 th century. The ramparts were reinforced and partially reconstructed. Today, the ruin – and its Burggaststätte (castle inn) – is a popular destination for day-trippers, and a well-known symbol of the Rebland wine region of Baden-Baden. The restored keep offers fantastic views of the Rhine Valley and the Black Forest.

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Baden-Baden, Germany
See all sites in Baden-Baden

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Seeger Kelly (14 months ago)
it's a beautiful place....good for family trip...after hiking a nice place for dinning and relax.....
Xfun Karina (14 months ago)
Nice,beautiful relaxing place,just to fill your soul.
B F (14 months ago)
Very friendly folks, amazing setting, good food, kitchen sometimes falls a little behind, enjoyed every visit!!
Oliver H. (18 months ago)
Here you can see a beautiful view to the blackforest.
Craig Puetz (19 months ago)
The view was amazing. The food was delicious and very reasonably priced, especially considering the location.
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