Aalen Kastell

Aalen, Germany

After abandoning the Alblimes (a Limes generally following the ridgeline of the Swabian Jura) around 150 AD, Aalen's territory became part of the Roman Empire, in direct vicinity of the then newly erected Rhaetian Limes. The Romans erected a castrum to house the cavalry unit Ala II Flavia milliaria; its remains are known today as Kastell Aalen. The site is west of today's town centre at the bottom of the Schillerhöhe hill. With about 1,000 horsemen and nearly as many grooms, it was the greatest fort of auxiliaries along the Rhaetian Limes. There were Civilian settlements adjacent along the south and the east. Around 260 AD, the Romans gave up the fort as they withdrew their presence in unoccupied Germania back to the Rhine and Danube rivers, and the Alamanni took over the region. Based on 3rd- and 4th-century coins found, the civilian settlement continued to exist for the time being. However, there is no evidence of continued civilization between the Roman era and the Middle Ages.

There is a Limes Museum located adjacent the Kastell.

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Address

Römerstraße 3, Aalen, Germany
See all sites in Aalen

Details

Founded: c. 150 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

www.romanfrontier.eu

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erhard Stichowski (2 years ago)
Nicolo vom Römer Kastell ist unser toller,gesünder und gut erzogener Riesenschnautzer. Wir haben diesen schönen Hund dank der sauberen Zucht und der unglaublichen,sehr entspannten Erziehungsmetode der Familie Schneider,die wir miterleben durften.
Kirsten Staebler (2 years ago)
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