St. George's Minster

Dinkelsbühl, Germany

St. George's Minster is the impressive and quite massive church at the historic heart of Dinkelsbühl. The core of the current structure was built in the 15th century - adding on to older buildings that had existed in this area.

The tower of the church was originally not planned to be the church tower at all - it was a free-standing structure to the west of the main building which had been built in the 12th century. However the ambitious plans for a tower at the northern end had to be put aside because of lack of money and the architects extended the church building to the old tower. The style of the main building is late Gothic.

The minster became popular with pilgrims in later centuries because of the highly-decorated altars inside the church. It is possible to climb the tower during weekend afternoons with good weather in the summer months.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.romanticroadgermany.com

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ingrid Beierbach (20 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne alte Kirche mit einer zur Zeit herrlichen Krippenlandschaft
Erich Wosny (2 years ago)
Die schönste Altstadt Deutschland zum Weihnachtszeit noch schöner
Marita Thiesen-Schieferdecker (2 years ago)
Sehr schönes Munster, im Innenraum eine riesige Krippe
Joseph Van Thillo (2 years ago)
Prachtige kerk, goed onderhouden. De kunstwerken zijn de moeite om eens binnen te gaan.
InspiringGiggly (2 years ago)
Very interesting Münster, worth it to go inside the church and even climb to the top for nice views.
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