Badenweiler Roman Baths

Badenweiler, Germany

The Badenweiler Roman bath ruins (Römische Badruine Badenweiler) are among the most significant Roman remains in Baden-Württemberg. To this day, the complex remains the best pre-served Roman spa north of the Alps.

When the Romans conquered this region in what is now southwestern Germany, they brought with them their established custom of bathing. Many of the thermal springs that had been used by the Celts became Roman spas. The bath in Badenweiler was constructed in several phases. In the second half of the first century AD, a small building housing two pools was erected. This was later followed by a reception area, changing facilities, the Roman equivalent of a sauna, with two cold pools, and stone terraces.

The Roman bath ruins have retained their symmetrical structure. The pools for warm and cold water still have their original surfaces. And large parts of the relaxation room and sauna area, which were lined with sandy limestone, also remain. The remains of the hypocaust heating system – a forerunner of today’s underfloor heating provide a further point of interest.

After the fall of the Roman Empire, the distinctive bathing tradition also began to wane. The Badenweiler complex had long been forgotten – until it was rediscovered and excavated by Margrave Carl Friedrich von Baden in 1784. In the late 19 th century, the ancient spa received a more contemporary counterpart: marble Neoclassicalstyle baths that were extensively extended during the subsequent decades. The natural springs, with temperatures up to 26.4 °C, were enjoyed in Roman times and form the basis for Badenweiler’s status as a spa town today. Since 2001, a spectacular, multiple award-winning glass roof, designed by Stuttgart engineers Schlaich, Bergermann und Partner, has protected the historical site.

The permanent exhibition at the bath ruins offers an insightful look at the Roman culture of bathing and provides fascinating facts about the entire complex.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Damian Gray (5 months ago)
Very great place. I lived in Badenweiler for about 5 years and went to bath every week. I am very happy with the place! Thank you Germany for a wonderful stay!
Jan Clierinck (16 months ago)
Relax! Good chilling place after a hard days work, soaking in thermal warm water and ice pools, inside and out. Especially in winter time when snow is outside, the pool is mystical with damp rising. It is clean, comfortable and a safe crowd, lots of well behaved couples. Parking in walking distnce is free. Coupon at the Thermen with entrance token. The free water out the fountain outside is one of the best mineral water you can drink! One glass max a day though. Wish I had some nice photos but the web site is great!
Konstantina Parsopoulou (16 months ago)
Nice place. + points: clean, baby friendly. - points: we waited more than 40minutes to order sth to eat. The closest parking is 5min walk.
Igor Eremenko (17 months ago)
Great selection of saunas, but do make sure you take an expansion ticket, just the pool part was a bit boring for my taste. But with saunas or Roman baths is quite enough for a full day!
Sanjay Shelat (17 months ago)
Best. Day. Ever. Allow at least a few hours, to take full advantage go for the day with a good book and a lunchbox so you can have a meal without having to que for the bistro. Highly recommend this place.
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