Badenweiler Roman Baths

Badenweiler, Germany

The Badenweiler Roman bath ruins (Römische Badruine Badenweiler) are among the most significant Roman remains in Baden-Württemberg. To this day, the complex remains the best pre-served Roman spa north of the Alps.

When the Romans conquered this region in what is now southwestern Germany, they brought with them their established custom of bathing. Many of the thermal springs that had been used by the Celts became Roman spas. The bath in Badenweiler was constructed in several phases. In the second half of the first century AD, a small building housing two pools was erected. This was later followed by a reception area, changing facilities, the Roman equivalent of a sauna, with two cold pools, and stone terraces.

The Roman bath ruins have retained their symmetrical structure. The pools for warm and cold water still have their original surfaces. And large parts of the relaxation room and sauna area, which were lined with sandy limestone, also remain. The remains of the hypocaust heating system – a forerunner of today’s underfloor heating provide a further point of interest.

After the fall of the Roman Empire, the distinctive bathing tradition also began to wane. The Badenweiler complex had long been forgotten – until it was rediscovered and excavated by Margrave Carl Friedrich von Baden in 1784. In the late 19 th century, the ancient spa received a more contemporary counterpart: marble Neoclassicalstyle baths that were extensively extended during the subsequent decades. The natural springs, with temperatures up to 26.4 °C, were enjoyed in Roman times and form the basis for Badenweiler’s status as a spa town today. Since 2001, a spectacular, multiple award-winning glass roof, designed by Stuttgart engineers Schlaich, Bergermann und Partner, has protected the historical site.

The permanent exhibition at the bath ruins offers an insightful look at the Roman culture of bathing and provides fascinating facts about the entire complex.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerd Hunzinger (21 months ago)
Top Thermalbad, Pico Belo :-)
delia tatulescu (2 years ago)
A great place to relax during the weekend with a nice view to the roman ruins and park nearby. The food is acceptable, but sometimes with long waiting. I appreciate mostly the cleanliness.
Nicola Riley (2 years ago)
Great place for relaxing. Friendly helpful staff . Beware the 'no Textiles' in seporate sauna area.
Steven Javor (2 years ago)
Nice therme with two pools. Beauty location and nice town walking distance for food and coffee.
Aaron Meder (2 years ago)
Nice thermal baths with indoor and outdoor bathing areas. It also features a good sauna landscape with six saunas, indoor bathing pool and experienced and friendly staff. Great to spend the day to relax. Good price / value. Everything is decent sized but not to big, can also get a bit crowded.
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