European Archaeological Park of Bliesbruck-Reinheim

Reinheim, Germany

The European Archaeological Park at Bliesbruck-Reinheim, in the German municipality of Gersheim and the French municipality of Bliesbruck, is a cross-border project which combines excavations and reconstructions of Celtic and Roman finds with exhibition and educational facilities. It was created in 1989 as a result of the archaeological work being done on both sides of the Franco-German border. Together with archaeological evidence from the Mesolithic Period, the Bronze Age, and the period of the Germanic migrations, the Celtic and Roman finds from the Iron Age bear witness to a history of continuous settlement in the Blies Valley that spans a period of 10,000 years.

Probably the most interesting excavation on the area is the Tomb of the Celtic Princess of Reinheim, dating from the 4th century BC. It is a woman's grave that was filled with exceptionally rich funerary objects. The burial chamber, constructed of oaken beams, was covered over by a massive mound of earth.

There is also a Roman villa in Reinheim. This very large complex includes courtyard walls enclosing an area 300 metres long and 135 metres wide with a main building to the north that measures almost 80 by 62 metres. One portion of the building in the north end of the west wing is thought to have been the villa's private thermal baths, due to the layout of its rooms and the discovery of water channels and fragments of cylindrical tiles (tubuli) attesting to the existence of under-floor heating (hypocaust).

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Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Beatrice Gaube (15 months ago)
Beau site archéologique ,très ludique, très pédagogique pour toute la famille ,avec un magnifique spectacle en costume d époque ,en été
David Jakob (16 months ago)
Schöner Park zum spazieren gehen. Leider wechselte der Pächter der alten Taverne. Die teils kroatische Küche war echt super. Schade.
Christoph Keseberg (2 years ago)
Really nice open air museums for the Roman age. I believe what makes it unique and adds to the charms is the fact that the museum actually crosses the border with France.
Mickael Smith (2 years ago)
Ok
Hin-Yan Liu (6 years ago)
This is a very informative and engaging park, unlike many similar sites elsewhere. A small note of caution about the informative aspect - if you do not read French or German you may have a tough time understanding some of the displays (it does not seem like it gets many visitors from further afield). But the staff are helpful and friendly, able to bridge the lack of English in the displays. Lovingly and carefully preserved to the point of almost being too much, the displays are very clear and despite having seen many similar sites elsewhere, we were still able to learn a lot because of how the park was displayed and preserved. The site continues to be developed, so may expand in the near future. It may be a little out of the way, but well-worth the effort to go and see (for the preservation strategies as much as the archaeological site itself).
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