Piazza della Loggia

Brescia, Italy

Piazza della Loggia is fine example of Renaissance piazza. The construction of eponymous Palazzo della Loggia (current Town Hall) began in 1492 under the direction of Filippo de' Grassi and completed only in the 16th century by Sansovino and Palladio. Vanvitelli designed the upper room of the palace (1769).

On the south side of the square are two 15th–16th century Monti di Pietà (Christian lending houses). Their façades are embedded with ancient Roman tombstones, one of oldest antique lapidary displays in Italy. At the centre of the east side of the square stands a tower with a large astronomical clock (mid-16th-century) on top of which there are two copper anthropomorphic automata which strike the hours on a bell. On May 28, 1974, the square was targeted by the terrorist bombing.

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User Reviews

Emmanuelle Vélon (4 months ago)
Everything was at the top. Super helpfull pre-welcoming. Top location, totally central Wonderfull room with privative terrasse Charming housse, all renovated Gorgeous breakfast. Vert nice team. What else ?? Emma from south of France.
Ayesha Nadeem (3 years ago)
It's looks so pretty especially at night
Muhammad Uzair (3 years ago)
It’s interesting place. There are a lot of pizzeria around. You can have a great view and good meal.
eleonora boglioni (3 years ago)
Nice New Year's vibe with music
S. M. (4 years ago)
I was pleasantly surprised by this city that I did not know before. Everything around us breathes antiquity and peace. I had a very pleasant time. I did not want to leave at all ...
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