Piazza della Loggia

Brescia, Italy

Piazza della Loggia is fine example of Renaissance piazza. The construction of eponymous Palazzo della Loggia (current Town Hall) began in 1492 under the direction of Filippo de' Grassi and completed only in the 16th century by Sansovino and Palladio. Vanvitelli designed the upper room of the palace (1769).

On the south side of the square are two 15th–16th century Monti di Pietà (Christian lending houses). Their façades are embedded with ancient Roman tombstones, one of oldest antique lapidary displays in Italy. At the centre of the east side of the square stands a tower with a large astronomical clock (mid-16th-century) on top of which there are two copper anthropomorphic automata which strike the hours on a bell. On May 28, 1974, the square was targeted by the terrorist bombing.

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ayesha Nadeem (16 months ago)
It's looks so pretty especially at night
Muhammad Uzair (17 months ago)
It’s interesting place. There are a lot of pizzeria around. You can have a great view and good meal.
eleonora boglioni (17 months ago)
Nice New Year's vibe with music
Carl Wayland (2 years ago)
Beautiful square in the heart of Brescia, lovely to walk around in summer evenings with lots of great restaurants and bars in the square and around it. Romantic atmosphere and lovely Italian people.
Craig Alexander (2 years ago)
The Renaissance piazza of the city. Particularly notable for the Loggia itself (construction started in 1492) - seat of city government since the Venetian era - and a fascinating collection of Roman epigraphy deliberately incorporated into the southern side of the pizza. The Venetian style clock at the eastern end is also well worth a look, showing not only the time but also moon phase, astrological data etc.
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