Rocca, a medieval castle with quadrangular bastions bounded by a canal with drawbridge, was built in 1124. It was the fortress of the noble family Scaligeri, who became the Lords of Verona. It was rebuilt several times and it was used by the Austrians as barracks in the 18th century. It is frequently the seat of cultural activities, especially during the summer months. It hosts the Civic Museum and of the Picture Gallery.

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Founded: 1124
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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pompei rebrean (17 months ago)
In the navel of the fair.
nicola paggetta (4 years ago)
nicola paggetta (4 years ago)
Nicola Artusi (5 years ago)
Bellissimi appartamenti in mansarda su stabile ristrutturato, nuovi, puliti e attrezzati di tutto, situati proprio nel punto di partenza per visitare Riva del Garda!!! Parcheggio interrato a pochi metri incluso nel prezzo! Ricordarsi di farsi fare documento di transito per il centro dai titolari del ristorante Villa Aranci, dove dovete fare il check-in, i dipendenti poi vi accompagneranno all'appartamento!!!
Nicola Artusi (5 years ago)
Beautiful apartments in the attic of renovated stable, new, clean and equipped with everything, right in the starting point to visit Riva del Garda !!! Underground parking a few meters included in the price! Remember that they should have the transit document for the center from the restaurant Villa Aranci holders, where you need to check-in, then the employees will accompany you to the apartment !!!
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