Wegelnburg Castle Ruins

Schönau, Germany

The Wegelnburg is a ruined castle near Schönau in the Palatinate Forest. It was founded by the Hohenstaufens in the 12th or 13th century. It had to protect the border of the Hohenstaufens’ territory. In 1272, the castle was destroyed because the castellan had committed a breach of the peace. The von Wegelnburg family rebuilt the castle.

In 1330 the Wegelnburg was pawned to the Palatinate and in 1417 it was given to the Duchy of Zweibrücken through barter. Because of the Treaty of Nijmegen the castle was destroyed by French troops under General Monclar in 1679. Owned by the Palatinate and then by Bavaria, the Wegelnburg was given to Rhineland-Palatinate and has been administered by its Castles Administration since 1963. During the restoration work from 1979 until 1982 the remains of the castle were saved and large amounts of rubble were removed.

Wegelnburg Castle was divided into three wards: a lower, middle and upper bailey, the lower bailey only being established on the western side. The internal gateway has been preserved and restored. Rock staircases, hewn into the sandstone rock, enable access to the upper ward. Niches, various timber holes, another stair and some renewed arches can be seen in the lower and middle wards.

The foundation walls on the sandstone rock are remarkable because of the smooth transition of the wall and the rock. Together with the rock caves they belong to the upper and middle bailey.

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Schönau, Germany
See all sites in Schönau

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

maurice papillon (9 months ago)
Top
wolfpack1983 (21 months ago)
I've been here but today it was completely closed due to construction or renovations. Iast year they were working on it and they still working on it. They take their sweet time lol. Thankfully there are other ruins to see nearby such as chateau de hohenbourg.
Wolfpack1983 (21 months ago)
I've been here but today it was completely closed due to construction or renovations. Iast year they were working on it and they still working on it. They take their sweet time lol. Thankfully there are other ruins to see nearby such as chateau de hohenbourg.
Joseph Evans (2 years ago)
Currently closed for renovations
Joseph Evans (2 years ago)
Currently closed for renovations
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