Château du Wasigenstein

Niedersteinbach, France

The Château du Wasigenstein is a ruined castle built in the 13th century. The site was first known as the centre of the German legend of Waltharius in the 10th century. From the Wengelsbach pass on the D 190, parking at Wasigenstein, a footpath of the Club Vosgien, signposted with red ractangles, leads to the castle.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reuven Debkberg (4 months ago)
nice view and walking
Roland Wach (6 months ago)
Lieu magique de par les vestiges encore visibles situé en plein milieu d'une belle forêt qui a revêtu ses couleurs d'automne.
Eugen Klöckner (6 months ago)
Hervorragende Picknickstelle. Die beiden Burgteile haben eine 360 Grad Umsicht und Platz diese zu genießen. Weiterhin gibt es unten am Fuß verschiedene Plätzchen um die Picknickdecke auszulegen. Besonders schön fand ich den Umstand, dass es keine direkte Autozufahrt oder Imbiss gibt. So bleibt der Ort naturbelassen und ruhig.
Elke Trevisani (7 months ago)
Hammer Burg die man gesehen haben muss! Bombige Aussicht über die ganze Umgebung.
Oh la la! (15 months ago)
Amazing fortress ruins.
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