Château de Frönsbourg

Lembach, France

Château de Frœnsbourg is a ruined French castle near the German border. The castle was indirectly mentioned in 1235. It is attested in 1269, in an account of the brothers 'of Frundsperg'. Until the 1340s, the castle would have belonged exclusively to the Frönsbourgs, who had the same armorial bearings as the Fleckensteins (of which family they were probably a branch).

A little before the middle of the 14th century, the castle was divided between the lords of Froensbourg (who kept half of it), Loewenstein and Sickingen. It was besieged and ruined, in 1349, because of the banditry of Reinhard von Sickingen, but was certainly restored after 1358, the date when the castle was offered as a stronghold to the Palatine Count. The dwelling tower on the southern rock, known as the small castle, was owned towards the end of the 15th century by Fleckenstein, who had it restored. Its main door is dated 1481.

The big castle occupied the whole of the northern rock. At the higher level, on the side of a likely attack, is a keep with living quarters towards the south. On the middle and lower floors were located the common buildings and dependences made of wood - traces of anchorings remain in the rocks - and troglodytic rooms. The lower courtyard stood in the west and there was a ditch to the north. There are several staircases cut into the rock. The castle was destroyed by the French in 1677 but was probably already abandoned at that time.

The castle stands on an isolated sandstone spur oriented north-south, separated from the mountain by a large ditch. The spur, split in two, comprises a longer and higher northern rock, connected at mid-level by a modern footbridge to the southern rock. At the base of the northern rock, on the north-western side, a low room is cut into the rock and joined by a narrow bay (of unspecified date) to a tiny cylindrical room leading to the middle level. This could correspond to an old well-cistern. Above the door is evidence of the anchoring for a drawbridge. Further south, a western projection with access door is located, a winding staircase cut in the sandstone, traces of buildings with a stable, a well in a corner and vestiges of staircases in the rock. At the middle level, to the east (reached via a modern staircase and a largely original door) are two rooms cut in the rock; to the north is the upper part of the old well-cistern. Towards the south, a square cistern close to the modern footbridge gives access to the small southern rock. This is entirely occupied by the remains of the dwelling tower whose Gothic arch doorway remains, dated 1481.

The remains of the northern keep and the lodgings towards the south, located on the higher terrace of the northern rock, are inaccessible.

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Address

Lembach, France
See all sites in Lembach

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nicolas Ehrismann (4 months ago)
An incredible medieval ruine castle. Definitely a must see if you visit the area
A. Barroca (4 months ago)
Great 360 viewsall! The castle fortress is in ruins (well kept) but there's some panels explaining life in a castle like this and some information on the history of the Fleckenstein family,who ruled over it some centuries ago. Beware the darkest parts inside and the narrow staircases. Good value for money. There's also a kids area - recommended.
Will Thompson (5 months ago)
Excellent place to visit! Kid and family friendly—this is a place you’ll be sad you missed if you’re visiting the area. There’s ample parking for whatever sized vehicle you’ve got. My minivan had no problems. From there, it’s a short hike to the welcome center—tickets, souvenirs, sitting area, and cafe. Fair priced and quick service! Then, you either go on the kid’s challenge trail OR head directly to the ruins. Visiting the ruins is included in the cost of the kids challenge trail. For my family of 5 (with a 4, 6, and 8 year old), we did the kids challenge trail. It engages the kids as the parents get to soak in the views, and it teaches everyone the history of the area. This ends up taking you on a nature hike thru the woods, and up to the actual ruins. The ruins are amazing—you can feel the history, and are granted some spectacular views. My kids loved it, and my wife and I noted how easy it was to get there, spend a day, and never think twice about much. It’s about an hour and a half from the Kaiserslautern area. The staff speaks German, French, and a fair bit of English. 100% recommend this place!
Marco de Groot (10 months ago)
A ruin of a castle standing on top of a rock surrounded by beautiful nature. Close by there's a hiking trail guiding you past other ruins.
Son p (13 months ago)
Gorgeous castle ruin and lovely views ? Dogs are welcome too. Vegetarian options available at biergarten (and fries = vegan).
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