The Heidenmauer ('heathen wall') is a circular rampart or ringwork, two and a half kilometres long, which was built by the Celts around 500 BC. The wooden elements of the wall have disappeared over the course of time by rotting away, but the stones have survived. Copious numbers of pottery finds have enabled a very precise dating. Almost all the containers are hand-made, only a few show traces of having been turned; this technology first appeared after ch 500 BC. in the La Tène period. Other finds included iron, long knives as well as querns, pyramidal stones that were stuck point-down in the ground in order to provide the base for the milling of corn. In addition there is also evidence of milk production and iron smelting.

In the 4th century A. D. a small part of the circular rampart as well as the Kriemhildenstuhl below was used by the Romans as a quarry.

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Bad Dürkheim, Germany
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Details

Founded: 500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Iron Age (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Waechter Horst (3 years ago)
German knights, German soil !!!!!!!
Stephan Lauinger (3 years ago)
Fascinating place.
Stefan Keil (4 years ago)
Nice forest area for hiking
Steff Die (4 years ago)
Only when you stand on the pagan wall can you see the true size of the Celtic building. Countless stones were piled up here to form a wall. Now they are hidden in the Palatinate Forest and slowly grow over.
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