The Callanish VIII stone setting is one of many megalithic structures around the better-known (and larger) Callanish Stones (I) on the west coast of the isle of Lewis. This is a very unusual (and possibly unique) setting, with a semicircle of four large stones on the edge of a cliff on the south of the island of Great Bernera and looking across a narrow strait to Lewis. There is no evidence that the cliff has collapsed here and destroyed half of a complete circle - it would appear that a semicircle was the original intention. The tallest stone is nearly three metres high and the cliff-edge axis of the circle gives a diameter of about 20 metres.

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Founded: 3000-2500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Dan Joseph (19 months ago)
These ancient megalithic stones were erected here in antiquity to facilitate the 420 gatherings. They are still used for this purpose today.
Dan Joseph (19 months ago)
These ancient megalithic stones were erected here in antiquity to facilitate the 420 gatherings. They are still used for this purpose today.
Lucyla Molina (21 months ago)
Incredible!!!
Lucyla Molina (21 months ago)
Incredible!!!
Heather Robinson (2 years ago)
Not many stones left but wonderful view if you keep walking past it and continue up the hill.
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