Dun Bharabhat is an Iron Age galleried dun (ancient fort) or 'semi-broch' situated on the island of Great Bernera. The broch stands high above the water, and is connected to the shore by a 30 metre causeway. The building is a D-shaped broch with a wall of uneven thickness. The broch measures 17 metres by 13 metres externally. The walls stand to a maximum height of 3.4 metres. The building is badly ruined, and strewn with rubble. The entrance is on the northwest but cannot be seen. Nevertheless, it is considered one of the best preserved of all the island duns.

A ground level gallery can be seen at the east end of the high wall where an opening shows a small part of it. A stairway is also present in this part of the building. The upper part of the wall contains the remains of two superimposed galleries. The opening of a longitudinal gallery or cell running northeast from the entrance can still be seen at the west end of the high wall. The intra-mural galleries are evident from the shore.

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Founded: 300-200 BC
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in United Kingdom

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