Torosay Castle was designed by architect David Bryce for John Campbell of Possil in the Scottish Baronial style, and completed in 1858. Torosay is surrounded by 4.9 ha of spectacular gardens including formal terraces laid out at the turn of the 20th century and attributed to Sir Robert Lorimer. The castle and gardens used to be open to the public, being linked to the Craignure ferry terminal by the Isle of Mull Railway.

The garden's Statue Walk is made up of 19 statues in the style of Italian sculptor Antonio Bonazza. The statues were acquired by then-owner Walter Murray Guthrie from a derelict garden near Milan and shipped to Scotland for next to nothing as ballast in a cargo ship.

Torosay Castle is currently closed to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Salt (2 years ago)
Presumably Closed just now as the directions tried to take me down a private lane and there were no signage anywhere through the village
Chris Salt (2 years ago)
Presumably Closed just now as the directions tried to take me down a private lane and there were no signage anywhere through the village
Gianluca Bonetti (2 years ago)
Amazing gardens, free to visit. Not always open to the public, please check with locals.
Gianluca Bonetti (2 years ago)
Amazing gardens, free to visit. Not always open to the public, please check with locals.
Catherine Henderson (3 years ago)
Although it's no longer open to the public the forest walk to the castle is lovely
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.