Castle Stalker is a four-storey tower house or keep set on a tidal islet on Loch Laich. The island castle's picturesque appearance, with its bewitching island setting against a dramatic backdrop of mountains, has made it a favourite subject for postcards and calendars, and something of a cliché image of Scottish Highland scenery. Castle Stalker is entirely authentic; it is one of the best-preserved medieval tower-houses surviving in western Scotland.

The original castle was a small fort, built around 1320 by Clan MacDougall who were then Lords of Lorn. Around 1388 the Stewarts took over the Lordship of Lorn, and it is believed that they built the castle in its present form around the 1440s. The Stewart's relative King James IV of Scotland visited the castle, and a drunken bet around 1620 resulted in the castle passing to Clan Campbell. After changing hands between these clans a couple of times the Campbells finally abandoned the castle in about 1840, when it lost its roof. In 1908 the castle was bought by Charles Stewart of Achara, who carried out basic conservation work. In 1965 Lt. Col. D. R. Stewart Allward acquired the castle and over about ten years fully restored it. Castle Stalker remains in private ownership and is open to the public at selected times during the summer.

While most castle scenes in the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) were filmed in and around Doune Castle, Castle Stalker appears in the final scene as 'The Castle of Aaaaarrrrrrggghhh'.

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Details

Founded: 1440s
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raw Vegan Guru (6 months ago)
Breathtaking location and atmosphere. Absolutely worth a visit, gorgeous surroundings. Very interesting history
Joey Broccardo (7 months ago)
We a great little castle. We missed the turn and got to see some amazing scenery along our way. Gift shop and cafe were cute. Definitely worth a quick stop. We had poor weather and it was still worth the stop.
YY Lam (8 months ago)
The castle is beautiful and stunning standing in the middle of water. The problem is there is no formal parking space or a view point except the private property nearby. You can only stop at the bins area and take a short walk towards Appin Station to have a good view to the castle
Gwion Hughes (10 months ago)
Nice view and delicious cafe overlooking the castle but i was unable to find a path to get near the castle
Jerald Kng (11 months ago)
Castle clearly not accessible, there’s a small parking area around the garbage bins, after that can take a stroll towards the water body and along the rocky beach, or can follow the cycling path until there’s an entrance in! Glad to be able to see this and capture some nice shots
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