Kilarow Parish Church is a rare round church commenced in 1767. Daniel Campbell the Younger brought Thomas Spalding to Islay for the specific purpose of building the church which was completed in 1769 and is therefore, in Islay, the oldest church building in which public worship takes place on a weekly basis. The Round Church is 18.2 metres in diameter and the walls are 0.85 metres thick. The main central pillar is 0.48 metres diameter at the base and is of timber, harled and plastered. The gallery of the church, which is 'U' shaped in plan, was added c.1830 and in some ways defeats the concept behind the original circular design whereby 'there were no corners in the church in which the Devil could hide.' The Round Church is open daily and well worth a visit.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1767
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruary Laidlaw (18 months ago)
A unique and well looked after church. The inside showed the structure off really well.
Maurizio Pigozzo (2 years ago)
Tipica chiesa di una tipica cittadina di pescatori scozzesi.. Pace, tranquillità e tanto verde.
Joe Roche (2 years ago)
Very interesting building sitting high above the Village of Bowmore with commanding view down the main street to the Harbour.
Jochn Visentin (3 years ago)
Strana chiesa rotonda
Joe Dudek (4 years ago)
I feel silly writing a review for a church, but this particular church and its parishioners are certainly worth writing about! I visited the Round Church on Christmas Day 2015. The view is stunning. The church itself is something to behold. The people, I must mention, are exquisitely friendly and welcoming. I felt at home joining the local parishioners for tea after the service was over. Bear in mind, I'm not a particularly religious person; I just wanted to experience going to church in Scotland on Christmas day! If you happen to be on the island for the weekend, stop by on Sunday. You won't regret it!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.