Lochindorb Castle Ruins

Highland, United Kingdom

Lochindorb Castle is a former stronghold of the Clan Comyn and is built on what now is said to be an artificially created island. The castle is first recorded during the Wars of Independence when Sir John ('the Black') Comyn died there in 1300. By 1455 the castle was in the hands of Archibald Douglas, Earl of Moray, The next year, after Douglas's defeat and death at Arkinholm, Lochindorb was again forfeited to the Crown and this time ordered to be slighted, the work of dismantling its defences being entrusted to the Thane of Cawdor. Since then, it has been left as a ruin.

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Highland, United Kingdom
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonathan Pittaway (2 years ago)
Great place to visit. Very remote but accessible by car. Restricted water sports access during breeding season. Nice views of Black Throated Divers (when in season) plus views of Grouse on moor.
David Mcdonald (2 years ago)
Perfect place for a bit of watersports
Robert Paterson (2 years ago)
We went paddle boarding, 1 wild swimmer in the water today. We went out the castle and back. In the middle of no where just you and your friends
Sonata Petrauskiene (2 years ago)
It’s the best place for pike fishing and the most opened area is suitable for bird watchers and due to Scottish heathers the place is attractive to the tourist for its extraordinary purple colour.
Sue Smith (3 years ago)
A beautifully remote, tranquil place with great walking. Perfect for birdwatchers.
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