Temple Wood is an ancient site located in Kilmartin Glen. The site includes two circles (north and south). The southern circle contains a ring of 13 standing stones about 12 metres in diameter. In the past it may have had 22 stones. In the centre is a burial cist surrounded by a circle of stones about 3 metres in diameter. Other later burials are associated with the circle. According to the Historic Scotland information marker at the site, the southern circle's first incarnation may have been constructed around 3000 BC.

The northern circle is smaller and consists of rounded river stones (which also fill the southern circle). In its centre is a single stone; another stone is found on the edge of the circle. This circle may have originated as a timber circle.

The name of the site originates in the 19th century (coinciding with the planting of trees around the circles) and has no relevance to the purpose of the site. It is located just south of the southern Nether Largie cairn.

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Founded: 3000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phil Nilsson (5 years ago)
Can be very atmospheric when the conditions are right. Free entry and well maintained too
andy munki (6 years ago)
Excellent cairn
Chris Hart (7 years ago)
Nice stones, not huge but really well kept.
Eilidh Haig (7 years ago)
Temple Wood is a beautiful and atmospheric place full of history. Well worth a visit.
Martin Holeysovsky (7 years ago)
Pretty nice given its accessibility
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