Saddell Abbey was a Cistercian monastery founded in 1207 by Ragnall, son of Somairle mac Gille Brigte. It was established by monks from Mellifont Abbey in Ireland. Very little is known about the abbey and its history. It probably enjoyed several centuries of good monastic life, but by the reign of James IV of Scotland monastic life had apparently disappeared. It was proposed to the Pope that the bishopric of Argyll should be moved from Lismore to Saddell as the former was in ruins.

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Founded: 1207
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Thomson (6 months ago)
lovely beach fir walking dog drove past entrance as didnt realise u had to go to castle fr entrance to beach ..peace and quiet with a lovely view
Lynn Richardson (6 months ago)
If you want to sit on a quiet beach and listen to mother nature breathing in and out. This is the place for you.
Babe Root (7 months ago)
Where Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney, Denny Laine, and The Campbeltown Pipe Band...filmed the famous video, "Mull Of Kintyre", from 1977. What a splendid track. It will always be in the hearts of those who love The Beatles, Wings, The Bagpipes, and of course...Scotland. I am from, and live in Texas, and am of Scotch/Irish descent...and this song...sends courses of emotion through my soul...that longs to know, who and how my ancestors lived. God bless...the Scotch/Irish. (And Paul, Linda, and Denny). ❤
Matt Huntley (3 years ago)
What can I say except the place is amazing, stayed here with my family and friends and already looking forward to our next stay. Set in a beautiful location, the ideal place to relax and unwind
Eddie Ford (4 years ago)
Came here for a wedding in November, it's a very tranquil Scenic little place. We stayed in the Cottage which was right next to "the grip", which is really a pleasure to stay in. As there is no WI-Fi or TV, it really is a chance to really get away from it all. As expected it was all very clean and tidy, beds were comfortable. Extra (wool) blankets, pillows, sheets etc etc were all freely available, so no chance of getting cold in bed. The beach and the rest of the castle grounds are definitely worth exploring as well as rest of the area as everywhere you look looks like a scene from a movie or postcard. In conclusion I would come here again as you can properly chill out.
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Royal Palace of Naples

Royal Palace of Naples was one of the four residences near Naples used by the Bourbon Kings during their rule of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (1734-1860): the others were the palaces of Caserta, Capodimonte overlooking Naples, and the third Portici, on the slopes of Vesuvius.

Construction on the present building was begun in the 17th century by the architect Domenico Fontana. Intended to house the King Philip III of Spain on a visit never fulfilled to this part of his kingdom, instead it initially housed the Viceroy Fernando Ruiz de Castro, count of Lemos. By 1616, the facade had been completed, and by 1620, the interior was frescoed by Battistello Caracciolo, Giovanni Balducci, and Belisario Corenzio. The decoration of the Royal Chapel of Assumption was not completed until 1644 by Antonio Picchiatti.

In 1734, with the arrival of Charles III of Spain to Naples, the palace became the royal residence of the Bourbons. On the occasion of his marriage to Maria Amalia of Saxony in 1738, Francesco De Mura and Domenico Antonio Vaccaro helped remodel the interior. Further modernization took place under Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. In 1768, on the occasion of his marriage to Maria Carolina of Austria, under the direction of Ferdinando Fuga, the great hall was rebuilt and the court theater added. During the second half of the 18th century, a 'new wing' was added, which in 1927 became the Vittorio Emanuele III National Library. By the 18th century, the royal residence was moved to Reggia of Caserta, as that inland town was more defensible from naval assault, as well as more distant from the often-rebellious populace of Naples.

During the Napoleonic occupation the palace was enriched by Joachim Murat and his wife, Caroline Bonaparte, with Neoclassic decorations and furnishings. However, a fire in 1837 damaged many rooms, and required restoration from 1838 to 1858 under the direction of Gaetano Genovese. Further additions of a Party Wing and a Belvedere were made in this period. At the corner of the palace with San Carlo Theatre, a new facade was created that obscured the viceroyal palace of Pedro de Toledo.

In 1922, it was decided to transfer here the contents of the National Library. The transfer of library collections was made by 1925.

The library suffered from bombing during World War II and the subsequent military occupation of the building caused serious damage. Today, the palace and adjacent grounds house the famous Teatro San Carlo, the smaller Teatrino di Corte (recently restored), the Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele III, a museum, and offices, including those of the regional tourist board.