Coeffin Castle was built on the site of a Viking fortress. The name Coeffin is thought to come from Caifen who was a Viking prince, and whose sister supposedly haunted the castle until her remains were taken back to be buried beside her lover in Norway.

Coeffin Castle was built in the 13th century, probably by the MacDougalls of Lorn. Lismore was an important site within their lordship, being the location of St. Moluag's Cathedral, seat of the Bishop of Argyll. The first written evidence of the castle occurs in 1469–70, when it was granted to Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy by Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll. It is unlikely to have been occupied in post-mediaeval times.

The ruins comprise an oblong hall-house and an irregularly shaped bailey. The great hall is an irregular rectangle, measuring 20.3 by 10.4 metres. The walls are from 2.1 to 2.4 metres thick. The bailey was mostly built at a later date than the hall. An external stair probably linked the entrance, in the north-east wall, to the bailey. A second door gave access to the sea to the south-west.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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canmore.org.uk

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User Reviews

Joshua Caleb (2 years ago)
Breathtaking location, and a fascinating slice of Lismore's history. The castle has all but been reclaimed by nature, and looks like it's jumped straight out the pages of a fairytale. Do look up the local legends about the castle to enjoy your visit even more!
John Marsden (2 years ago)
The end point of a delightful evening walk on a sunny evening. You can almost see the Vikings pulling their longboats up on the beach.
nati yr (2 years ago)
Very nice place
Whitney Bex (2 years ago)
A really pretty castle, with a fascinating story that our guide Robert told to us. There is a little bay next to it and I found the most amazing pebbles. We had amazing weather and I think that does help. It is a bit isolated so if you plan to walk there, allow a bit time. And don't follow the way the sign points, stick to the track (or else you go through several fields full of sheep!).
Simon Dolding (4 years ago)
Wonerfully isolated romantic sport the ruins of a medieval castle invoke images of Viking raids. Still enough substance to the structure to get a feel for the design. A bit of a trek (about a mile or so from main road and a very steep path to negotiate ) but the effort is worth it. Also look out for the fish trap built into the foreshore of the loch underneath the castle walls.
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