Coeffin Castle Ruins

Argyll and Bute, United Kingdom

Coeffin Castle was built on the site of a Viking fortress. The name Coeffin is thought to come from Caifen who was a Viking prince, and whose sister supposedly haunted the castle until her remains were taken back to be buried beside her lover in Norway.

Coeffin Castle was built in the 13th century, probably by the MacDougalls of Lorn. Lismore was an important site within their lordship, being the location of St. Moluag's Cathedral, seat of the Bishop of Argyll. The first written evidence of the castle occurs in 1469–70, when it was granted to Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy by Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll. It is unlikely to have been occupied in post-mediaeval times.

The ruins comprise an oblong hall-house and an irregularly shaped bailey. The great hall is an irregular rectangle, measuring 20.3 by 10.4 metres. The walls are from 2.1 to 2.4 metres thick. The bailey was mostly built at a later date than the hall. An external stair probably linked the entrance, in the north-east wall, to the bailey. A second door gave access to the sea to the south-west.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

canmore.org.uk

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keltie Forbes (11 months ago)
Lovely ruins of a 12th castle with sheep and horses. Beautiful spot for a picnic.
Stephen (2 years ago)
Great views on a clear day, perhaps not the best place to live
Qasim M (2 years ago)
Really worthwhile walk to a castle ruin covered in beautiful greenery
Damien Mc Kay (3 years ago)
The views and scenery is just breathtaking
SGMP (3 years ago)
Castle Coeffin is a ruin on the island of Lismore, an island in Loch Linnhe, in Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland. Interesting castle, but that's quite a lot of sand buildup within the remaining walls for something on a grass plane.
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