Roemer- und Pelizaeus-Museum

Hildesheim, Germany

The Roemer- und Pelizaeus-Museum Hildesheim, mostly dedicated to Ancient Egyptian and Ancient Peruvian art, also includes the second largest collection of Chinese porcelain in Europe. Furthermore, the museum owns collections of natural history, ethnology, applied arts, drawings and prints, local history and arts, as well as archeology. Apart from the permanent exhibitions, the museum hosts temporary exhibitions of other archaeological and contemporary topics.

In 2000, the old building, originally built in the 1950s, was replaced by a new building, significantly increasing the space available for exhibitions.

The current museum is the result of the union of the Roemer Museum, founded in 1844 (and named after one of the founders, Herrmann Roemer), and the Pelizaeus Museum, established in 1911, that had housed the private collection of Egyptian antiques of Wilhelm Pelizaeus.

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Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gloria Gloria (3 years ago)
It was really intresting to visit
kdbendtsen (3 years ago)
Not a particularly large museum but still rather good with excellent temporary exhibitions. There are often interesting activities for children and it's also fun to wander around through a seemingly labyrinthine rabbit warren of rooms and see where you end up! Definitely a good choice to spend a half day in the winter months!
Sebastian Mueller (3 years ago)
Awesome museum that is providing a lot of insight into early Egyptology. Always good for a visit. The special exhibits are quite neat as well and offer a lot of value for the entrance fee. Would definitely recommend to anyone who has interest in Egyptology.
Tanya К. (3 years ago)
absolutely complete and lovely. Wonderful staff, shop and try the food too.Lovely.
Wolfgang Schmahl (4 years ago)
Small but well organized museum with phantastic display of ancient Egypt. Reconstruction of a noble tomb with decorated with grape vines. Informative displays on life in ancient Egypt
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