Lier Béguinage

Lier, Belgium

Béguinage of Lier is today a walled village in the community and consists of 162 buildings and St. Margaret's Church. One of the four entrances to the beguinage is a renaissance gate surmounted by a statue of the Holy Begga. Lier Béguinage was founded in the 1258, when three sisters decided found a place for spiritual women. About 200 years later, the beguinage was grown and had a church, hospital and three monasteries. Beguinage was damaged by fire in 1485, 1526 and 1542. Baroque gate was built around 1690. St. Margaret Church Baroque façade is from the 1600s.

During the French Revolution Lier Beguinage was confiscated and sold. In the 1990s, large parts of houses were restored. Today Lier Béguinage is one of Flemish Béguinages described as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Address

Pompstraat 2, Lier, Belgium
See all sites in Lier

Details

Founded: 1258
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Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan Vranken (4 years ago)
Better than Bruges
Bart Van Bos (4 years ago)
Great historical authentic area!
Johan Herbosch (4 years ago)
Very nice and authentic beguinage in the beautyfull town Lier. Romantic and quiet.
yves frombelgium (5 years ago)
Well restored historic area...we visited here on a Sunday noon and the place was totally deserted, which added to the atmosphere
Tom Willems (5 years ago)
More beautiful than the begijnhof of Brugge. I believe some scenes of a popular ketnet show called 'de nachtwacht' have been filmed here.
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