St. Nicholas Church

Brussels, Belgium

The Église St-Nicolas is a delightful little church behind the Bourse in Brussels. It is surrounded by fine old houses that seem to huddle under it.

This small church is almost 1,000 years old, but little remains of the original structure. Its 11th-century Romanesque lines are hidden by a 14th-century Gothic facade and the repairs made after the French bombardment of 1695. A cannonball fired by the French in 1695 is still lodged in one of the pillars.

The church holds a small painting by Rubens of The Virgin and Child and the Vladimir Icon painted by an artist from Constantinople in 1131.Église St-Nicolas

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

www.sacred-destinations.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ertug Duzgunes (10 months ago)
Impressive arthitecture in very good condition
Avril Darabian (11 months ago)
Beautiful old gothic Roman Catholic church near Grand Place in Brussels, Belgium. One of the several that still celebrate Mass.
Abuzar Chishti (14 months ago)
St. Nicholas' Church (Dutch: Sint-Niklaaskerk) is one of the oldest and most prominent landmarks in Ghent, Belgium. Begun in the early 13th century as a replacement for an earlier Romanesque church, construction continued through the rest of the century in the local Scheldt Gothic style (named after the nearby river). Typical of this style is the use of blue-gray stone from the Tournai area, the single large tower above the crossing, and the slender turrets at the building's corners.
Andrija Petrovic (14 months ago)
Good place for a chat with the Man
Fabrizio Ferracin (16 months ago)
Small, but beautiful. It's right behind the old Stock Exchange and close to the Grand Place.
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