Blegny-Mine is one of the four major coal mines in Wallonia, a recognised UNESCO world heritage site. It is an authentic coal mine with underground galleries accessible for the visitors through the original shaft.

In Blegny, the coalworking started in the 16th century under the impulse of the Monks of Val-Dieu, owners of the coal area. The first granting, Trembleur, was allowed to Gaspar Corbesier in 1799. This marked the beginning of the industrial coal working. Corbesier's descendants get the granting Argenteau which is settled near Trembleur. both grantings were put together in 1883 and totalise 2,171 acres. In 1887 the activities stopped for 30 years and the company is put into liquidation.

In 1919, a new company was created and the family Ausselet grounded the 'Company of Argenteau'. the production grew rapidly and reached 84.000 tons in 1931. During the Second World War, the tour of the pit 1 and the coal-washing building were destroyed. Coal extraction still remained by using the 'Pit Mary' but consequently with a lower rate of production. From 1942 till 1948 the pit and the wah-and-sorting building were reconstructed.

The production continued and reached 232.000 tons for 680 mineworkers. In 1975, the Industrial ans Social Ministerial Committee of Belgium stopped state grants to coal mines. In the region of Liège, the coal mines were closed one by one. The latest one 'Argenteau-trembleur' closed on March 31st, 1980.

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Founded: 1799
Category: Industrial sites in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Poker Face (14 months ago)
Exellent learning experience for children and adults of another reality. Hard very hard work. Nice playground outside and terrace.
Unda Z (14 months ago)
Second visit. They offer guided tours in Dutch and French with an audioguide in English available. During this visit the audioguides were sent away for repairs. The guide was very knowledgeable and made sure that we understood everything.
Extreme Road Trip (2 years ago)
Great spot to visit. Makes you appreciate your current line of work
Rens (2 years ago)
Really nice place. We had a guided tour through the mine. The guide was really exited and knew how to make the mine even more interesting. The tour was 2 hours and I can highly recommend it.
Gabriel Plume (2 years ago)
Really good visit with friendly employees and a hilarious tour guide. It is well made and shows obvious appreciation of what miners went through. As a 15 year old, I see it as great for my age group and would be brilliant for all other age groups.
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