The temple of Ħaġar Qim stands on a hilltop overlooking the sea and the islet of Fifla. At the bottom of the hill, only 500m away, lies another remarkable temple site, Mnajdra found above the Southern cliffs. The surrounding landscape is typical Mediterranean garigue and spectacular in its starkness and isolation.

First excavated in 1839, the remains suggest a date between 3600 – 3200 BC, a period known as the Ġgantija phase in Maltese prehistory. Ħaġar Qim was in fact never completely buried as the tallest stones, remained exposed and featured in 18th and 19th century paintings. The site consists of a central building and the remains of at least two more structures. The large forecourt and the monumental facade of the central structure follow the pattern typical of Maltese Prehistoric Temples. Along the external wall one may find some of the largest megaliths used in the building of these structures, such as a 5.2m high stone and a huge megalith estimated to weigh close to 20 tonnes.

The building itself is made up of a series of C-shaped rooms, known as apses. Walking through the main entrance, one finds a central paved space with an apse on each side. These apses are more firmly screened off than is usual at other temple sites using walls and slabs with square shaped portholes cut through as doorways. During excavations a slab bearing a pair of opposing spirals in relief and a free-standing pillar decorated on all four sides were found in the area. These have been replaced with replicas on site and the originals can be found at the National Museum of Archaeology.

Through the inner passage one finds an apse on the right and a large space on the left. The apse on the right has a curious setting of low stone slabs forming an inner enclosure. At the rear of this apse is a small elliptical hole. The rays of the rising sun on the first day of summer, the Summer Solstice, pass through this hole and illuminate one of the low slabs.

The large space on the left holds three high so-called ‘table altars’ and a doorway to an additional chamber reached by three steps. Three more chambers form part of this building but these can only be reached through doorways along the outer wall. Much of interest has been unearthed at Ħaġar Qim, notably stone and clay statuettes of obese figures which are also found at the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta.

Ħaġar Qim is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, inscribed as part of ‘The Megalithic Temples of Malta’ in the World Heritage List.

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Address

Triq Hagar Qim, Qrendi, Malta
See all sites in Qrendi

Details

Founded: 3700-3200 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Malta

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reinhart Lutz (6 months ago)
Very impressive megalithic site. Absolutely worth your visit. Oldest existing free standing building of humanity. Excellent museum to prepare you for the vist to the actual site you are allowed to enter for a fee. Friendly staff on hand. Very clean restrooms for free.
Elizabeth Fu (6 months ago)
This was an amazing experience. You can download the audio guide on your phone. I got chills while watching the different things that were build, it is so fascinating. I will never regret going there.
Miss K (7 months ago)
We traveled from Ireland to this incredible place , one of the most spectacular Temple complexes I have ever visited and I have been to so many around the world but this is my favorite . In fact we cancelled out flights home to revisit again and again. The experience was made all the better by the incredible staff ! They all really do their best to help you have the a wonderful visit . A BIG thank you to staff members Justin , Phillis , Paul and all the others who made us so welcome , five stars to you all :) See you soon !
Jeffrey Noble (13 months ago)
Fascinating site which resonates with the very ancient past. In July 2021, there were a few visitors but it was hardly an issue. Amazing how few people are aware of these Maltese megalithic sites. Better for me I guess.
tom waugh (2 years ago)
A trip back in pre history in a fascinating temple complex where the builders mapped the stars and produced their own calendars. You can see carved doorways and sacrifice spots as well as some of the oldest free-standing megaliths in the world. Older than Stonehenge or the pyramids. There is a colony of stray cats that congregate near the visitor centre. They are fed and cared for by the locals. If I go again, I'll take several tins of cat food with me!
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