Bugibba Temple

Buġibba, Malta

Buġibba Temple is megalithic stone setting located a short distance from the coast, between Buġibba and Qawra Point. It was built during the Tarxien phase of Maltese prehistory. The temple is quite small, and part of its coralline limestone façade can still be seen. From the trilithon entrance, a corridor leads to a central area which contains three apses. Part of the temple"s floor has also survived at the back of the site.

The rest of the structure was destroyed over the years, as the area was leveled due to being used for agricultural purposes.

Buġibba Temple was discovered by the Maltese archaeologist Themistocles Zammit in the 1920s, when he discovered large stones in a field close to Qawra Point. The temple was excavated in 1928 by Zammit and L. J. Upton Way. During the excavations, two decorated stone blocks were found. One is a carved square block that was an altar, and the other is a rectangular block with carved fish on two of its faces. These blocks are now in the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta.

Eventually, the Dolmen Resort Hotel was built around the temple, which was incorporated into the grounds of the hotel close to its swimming pools.

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Address

Triq Ghawdex, Buġibba, Malta
See all sites in Buġibba

Details

Founded: 3150-2500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joanne Blackman (38 days ago)
I really can't believe it could be so old
Frenchie (48 days ago)
Never knew, everyday is a school day, very historic city
Damian Leszczyński (3 months ago)
Hard to say... You have to See it by your own to decide if its worth to see.
Michał “Nojmek” Neumann (4 months ago)
Very nice pile of rocks
Babu Tailor (6 months ago)
Located within Dolman Hotel. Not as impressive as other similar structures in Malta
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