Rotunda of Mosta

Mosta, Malta

The Church of the Assumption of Our Lady, commonly known as the Rotunda of Mosta, is the third largest unsupported dome in the world and the third largest in Europe.

Built in the 19th century on the site of a previous church, it was designed by the Maltese architect Giorgio Grognet de Vassé. Its dome is among the largest in the world, with an internal diameter of 37.2 metres. the rotunda walls are 9.1 metres thick (necessary to support the weight of the dome). The rotunda dome is the third-largest church dome in Europe and the ninth largest in the world.

Grongnet's plans were based on the Pantheon in Rome. Construction began in May 1833 and was completed in the 1860s. The original church was left in place while the Rotunda was built around it, allowing the local people to have a place of worship while the new church was being built. The church was officially consecrated on the 15 of October 1871.

On April 9, 1942, during an World War II air-raid, a 500 kg Luftwaffe bomb pierced the dome and fell among a congregation of more than 300 people awaiting early evening mass. It did not explode. The same type of bomb as pierced the dome is now on display (the original was dumped at sea) at the back of the church in the Sacristy.

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Address

Triq Il-Parrocca, Mosta, Malta
See all sites in Mosta

Details

Founded: 1833-1871
Category: Religious sites in Malta

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Rendell (12 months ago)
This place is incredible. So stunning and peaceful, full of history that you just don't realise is there until you see it. This is a must visit location.
Teenie Ribenie (12 months ago)
Beautiful church. Interesting dome. Full of interesting statues, pictures, video and a replica of the WW2 bomb that came through the dome and failed to explode. Well worth a visit.
Con Stroulios (12 months ago)
This amazing historic church is fascinating, during g the war a bomb was dropped on it, with a full service happening, and it didn't explode. Everyone inside was safe, no injuries no deaths, if this is not amazing, who knows??? Worth the trip and the walk around!!!
Marija Stojkovic (12 months ago)
I like this church ... it is very big and beautiful ... with the special energy . The bomb bomb is still there ... didn't exploded.. what is a God miracle ...
Maria Petrova (13 months ago)
Worth the trip from Valletta . The dome is very beautiful and impressive. Definitely something to experience . Small fee to get in and there is also a WWII shelter to check out.
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