Rottenbuch Abbey Church

Rottenbuch, Germany

Rottenbuch Abbey was founded as an Augustinian monastery in 1073 on land granted by Duke Welf I of Bavaria. The Abbey church was constructed between 1085 and 1125 in the Romanesque style. The design of a crossing transept and free-standing tower is unusual for a Bavarian church. Rottenbuch was a center of papal loyalty during the Investiture Controversy. Under the patronage of Emperor Louis the Bavarian in the 14th century, together with its location on the pilgrimage route to Italy, Rottenbuch became the most influential house of Canons Regular in Germany.

In the 18th century the medieval interior of the church was redecorated in the ornate High Baroque style by painter Matthäus Günther and stuccoist Josef Schmuzer. With the secularization of the Bavarian monasteries under Montgelas in 1803 the monastic buildings were pulled down and the noteworthy library sent to a paper mill; the Abbey church became a parish church, which it remains to this day.

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Details

Founded: 1073
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henry Wong (10 months ago)
Amazing Boroque/rococo church
Olya T. (11 months ago)
Beautiful church in a very quiet location.
Karen Finkenbinder (13 months ago)
This is a gem. I like this better than Wieskirche. It is not well-known so a great place for spiritual reflection and relaxation. Absolutely beautiful. The cafe across the street is very nice.
sharne dodds (2 years ago)
Wonderfully decorated church, open to visitors free of charge. Would recommend if in the area.
Alan Hardware (2 years ago)
A very small village which is built around the church and convent. Some good accomodation in and close by. A lovely little cafe with a good selection of food and drinks. Cakes are very nice. Easy trip out to Neuschwanstein etc.
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