Uuemõisa estate (Neunenhof) is first mentioned in 1539 and then belonged to the Bishopric of Saare-Lääne. During the Swedish time it for a long period of time was a part of the vast domains of the De la Gardie family. The last owner before the Estonian land reform of 1919 was Eugenie Mikhailovna Shakhovskaya, the world's first female fighter pilot. After the Estonian declaration of independence, it was used by the Estonian Ministry of Defence. During the Soviet occupation of Estonia, the Red Army occupied the buildings. The current manor was built in mid 19th-century, with additions made in 1921-1923 by architect Karl Burman.

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Details

Founded: 19th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arne Dunkel (2 years ago)
Seal on perekonnaseisu amet ja ma käisin oma naise surmatunnistuse järel.
Elle Maksimova (2 years ago)
Uuemõisa pargis ei ole enam võimalik käija jalutamas eakal inimesel kas üksi või ka lapselapsega. Nimelt vana planeeringuga olid pingid läbi aasta ja oli võimalik puhata jalga. Nüüd kas mine MÕISA bussipeatusesse või külmal Mõisahoone TREPIL. Seda sai ka tehtud. Mis toimub.. Eakad tahetakse juba varakult maha kanda. Tänan.
Randar Narme (2 years ago)
Wonderful place that looks and feels good!
Marten Kiisa (3 years ago)
See gool a Oli lahe myl melti õpita
Emily D (6 years ago)
Beautiful house, paintings, friendly staff. Great pictures
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