Břevnov Monastery is a Benedictine archabbey founded by Saint Adalbert, the second Bishop of Prague, in 993 AD with the support of Duke Boleslav II of Bohemia. Hence the first Benedictine male monastery in Bohemia, it also has the oldest tradition of beer brewing in the Czech Republic, up to today, the Břevnovský Benedict beer is brewed here.

The first monks descended form Niederaltaich Abbey in Bavaria, filial monasteries were established at Broumov and Police in northern Bohemia.

During the Hussite Wars in the 1420s, abbot and convent fled to Broumov and the entire monastery including brewery were nearly destroyed. After the Thirty Years' War, the construction of a Baroque monastery complex has been realized under Abbot Othmar Daniel Zinke in 1708–1740 according to plans designed by Christoph Dientzenhofer. The interior of the buildings, including St Margaret's church, the conventual buildings and prelate's house was designed by his son Kilian Ignaz Dientzenhofer, with altarpieces by Petr Brandl, a ceiling fresco by Cosmas Damian Asam and stucco works by his brother Egid Quirin Asam. At the same time the annual production of beer reached up to 5,000 hl.

After the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938, the monastery was seized by Wehrmacht forces during World War II and finally expropriated by the Communist Czechoslovak government in 1950. Abbot Anastáz Opasek (1913-1999) was condemned for high treason and espionage in a show trial, the monastery was dissolved and the remaining monks were deported, if they had not fled to Bavarian Braunau in Rohr Abbey re-established by their Broumov brothers in 1946.

The complex was used until 1990 by the StB, after the Velvet Revolution, was thoroughly repaired from 1991 until its 1000-years-jubilee in 1993. In 1997 it was visited by Pope John Paul II and was elevated to the rank of an Archabbey.

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Founded: 993 AD
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petr Novak (7 months ago)
The beer festival was awesome. Next day morning wasn't that good. ?
Vojta Fikker (7 months ago)
Very nice location with few shops in the area, selling local products. You can also sit there and enjoy local beer or have a snack. There's also a beautiful park.
Stepan Vodopyanov (8 months ago)
Cool crafted beer , very nice atmosphere , you are literally drinking monk beer inside if monastery. Only 4 stars because there is not much food to choose.
Demur Nodia (11 months ago)
If you want to try less touristic place with amazing beer and food this is a great place to visit. Try local beers garlic bread and pork.
Kateřina Valešová (14 months ago)
Beautiful monastery building and its nearby park with orangery and garden, quite quiet place where to rest under the trees. Or if you want you can visit a local monastery brewery. ?
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