Břevnov Monastery is a Benedictine archabbey founded by Saint Adalbert, the second Bishop of Prague, in 993 AD with the support of Duke Boleslav II of Bohemia. Hence the first Benedictine male monastery in Bohemia, it also has the oldest tradition of beer brewing in the Czech Republic, up to today, the Břevnovský Benedict beer is brewed here.

The first monks descended form Niederaltaich Abbey in Bavaria, filial monasteries were established at Broumov and Police in northern Bohemia.

During the Hussite Wars in the 1420s, abbot and convent fled to Broumov and the entire monastery including brewery were nearly destroyed. After the Thirty Years' War, the construction of a Baroque monastery complex has been realized under Abbot Othmar Daniel Zinke in 1708–1740 according to plans designed by Christoph Dientzenhofer. The interior of the buildings, including St Margaret's church, the conventual buildings and prelate's house was designed by his son Kilian Ignaz Dientzenhofer, with altarpieces by Petr Brandl, a ceiling fresco by Cosmas Damian Asam and stucco works by his brother Egid Quirin Asam. At the same time the annual production of beer reached up to 5,000 hl.

After the German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938, the monastery was seized by Wehrmacht forces during World War II and finally expropriated by the Communist Czechoslovak government in 1950. Abbot Anastáz Opasek (1913-1999) was condemned for high treason and espionage in a show trial, the monastery was dissolved and the remaining monks were deported, if they had not fled to Bavarian Braunau in Rohr Abbey re-established by their Broumov brothers in 1946.

The complex was used until 1990 by the StB, after the Velvet Revolution, was thoroughly repaired from 1991 until its 1000-years-jubilee in 1993. In 1997 it was visited by Pope John Paul II and was elevated to the rank of an Archabbey.

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Founded: 993 AD
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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User Reviews

Mariana Amaral (2 months ago)
Amazing place. We took the guided tour through the Monastery, and it was not only great and full of information but also very cheap. Highlight was our guide, who was super sweet and well informed. You can e-mail them and pre-book online. After the tour, we had lunch at the local restaurant. Great food, and some waiters speak fluent English. It was a great experience, I highly recommend it.
Jan Đonny Záruba (2 months ago)
We have been in the monastery restaurant. They have great selection of traditional medieval Czech cuisine - don't expect much light and healthy food ;-). You can find here duck, rabbit, ostrich, beef, pork, chicken, fish and more... Their deserts are also good. Despite medieval interior and atmosphere, cards are accepted ;-).
Petra Kiššová (3 months ago)
Guided tour which took 2 hours was excellent with the best guide ever! We were even showed rooms under the monastery which most people don't even know about. Beautiful place for relaxing, having a long walk in the park and a great beer as a bonus.
Budimir Zvolanek (4 months ago)
Church open most of the time as is their beer hall on the grounds. One of the oldest Prague's Catholic churches, beautiful interior and great sounding organ at Mass or organ concerts. Outdoor park gardens also enjoyable.
Jana Chocholousova (4 months ago)
The oldest catholic monastery in this country, over 1000 years old. Holly place. Beautiful basilica. Nice parks to walk around, away from the crowd.
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