The Church of the Assumption of Our Lady and Saint John the Baptist is a Gothic and Baroque Gothic church in Kutná Hora. It is listed in the UNESCO World Heritage List together with the Chapel of All Saints and its ossuary and other monuments in Kutná Hora. It is one of the most important Czech Gothic buildings built in the time of the very last Přemyslids and also a very important and one of the oldest examples of the Baroque Gothic style.

The church was built first in the Gothic style around 1300 as one of the first High Gothic building in the Kingdom of Bohemia and as the first church in the kingdom resembling French Gothic cathedrals. It was built on the place of an older church and was a part of the Cistercians Sedlec Abbey, which was the oldest Cistercian abbey in the Czech lands founded in 1142. The abbey was burnt down by the Hussites in 1421 and the church became a ruin for the next two centuries.

In 1700 the abbot of the Sedlec Abbey Jindřich Snopek decided to rebuild the old church. The reconstruction was conducted by the architect Pavel Ignác Bayer. After three years the new architect became Jan Blažej Santini-Aichel who had worked for the Cistercians already in Zbraslav. He completed the reconstruction of the church in his original style called Baroque Gothic. His most impressive works in the church are the amazing vaults and front wall of the church with its antechamber decorated with the statues by Matěj Václav Jäckel. The church was consecrated in 1708.

Although the church was rebuilt in the early 18th century his eastern part with side chapels, choir and transept should have preserved its original appearance from outside.

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Founded: c. 1300
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kevin Bradshaw (2 years ago)
Absolutely fascinating and I’m so gleam I finally made it here. It only took ten years, but I can honestly it was worth it. The train journey was about an hour in which you get to witness the glorious Czech countryside and we did so in the snow. What a sight! The church itself is beautiful, but it’s the information supplied that really brings it all to life. To bare witness to something many of hundred years old is really quite special. All in all, you MUST see this place. The town also is nice with many friendly people. 5/5.
Ranjith Kizhakoodan Rajan (3 years ago)
Close to sedlec ossuary.though people visit ossuary and tend to go back without noticing this church ....but I would say this church is worth visiting though you feel from outside its just an another Czech church .this church also have long old story to tell you right from its construction .its got huge altar and some here special is you can visit roof of the church ...you may find my photos for that ..it's something you not see usual
Gr Ace (3 years ago)
A very beautiful Cathedral. You must go upstairs as it gives you a better view. The spiral staircase is so nice and it gives you a chance to go through the attick. From there, you will see the beautiful pillars of the church.
Martin Beránek (3 years ago)
I remember the time this was run down old church, now it is renovated old church with huge historical value. City did a great job to promote the place and make it a tourist destination. Good job!
Ben Park (3 years ago)
Very nice historic church. Very bright church. The first church I've been to where you can see the roof and above the vaulted ceilings.
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