Kačina is a significant empire style palace built in place of the defunct medieval village Kačín. It was built as a prestige mansion of the supreme burgrave of the Kingdom of Bohemia and president of governorate Jan Rudolf Chotek (1748–1824) from 1806 to 1824. The architectural scheme was drawn up by Saxon royal architect Christian Franz Schuricht (1753–1832) from Dresden. Johann Philipp Jöndl (1782–1870) and in the last few years also had controlled running the construction. He also eminently influenced the final appearance of the castle.

Functionally the castle is divided into three parts. The main building with exquisite halls and the residence of earl family, then two quarter circle adjacent lower wings with pillared colonnade where the guest rooms were situated. To those wings were connected other pavilions. In the right one is situated never finished mansion chapel and theatre which were finished in the first half of 19th century.

In the left one there is a Chotek's extensive library dated from 16th to 19th century. The castle is surrounded by vast park that was founded already in 1789 according to the plan of famous Viennese botanist Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin (1727–1817), it was completed thirteen years earlier than the castle itself.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1806-1824
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miti Inocentul (18 months ago)
Very beautiful! :)
Johan W (2 years ago)
Boring bad garden. If no event not worth going.
Karel Stefulik (2 years ago)
Amazing castle with nice garden - it's more for relaxing walk than anything else
Jan Toman (2 years ago)
Well preserved aristocratic residence in empire style.
Ryp Pav (2 years ago)
Love this place. Garden was never finished so it is like big park with grass and trees. Very romantic place.
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