The Chateau Valtice belonged to Liechtenstein family from 1387 until 1945. There is one hundred impressive rooms in the four-wing building of the Chateau Valtice. The tour of the Baroque residence, surrounding park and a wine bar in the neighborhood takes at least half a day, and it is accessible only seventeen rooms! The furniture is in the Baroque and Rococo style and it creates a perfect imagine of a life of the rich noblemen in the 17th and 18th century.

In Valtice, there was originally a castle. Its owners was often changed, e.g. it was the legacy of six daughters of a nobleman, or other times it was divided among the three families. The third wife of John I. of Liechtenstein, Elizabeth, gained an one-sixth of the inheritance of the Chateau Valtice in the second half of the 14th century. Elizabeth bequeathed her share to her husband and so the Liechtenstein family acquired the chateau, which became a basis of a huge estate (30,000 ha), that the Liechtenstein family built and managed until the end of the Second World War.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaroslav Leitmann (jaroleitmann) (13 months ago)
A very beatiful place and surroundings. Definitely worth visiting the town and the palace.
Damián Dvornický (14 months ago)
Beautiful place beautiful people you can even find word's wine collection at the mansion. One minus to that place is that restaurant, the food is average and most of those wines they offer is just not good only the brand Moravina can satisfy you if you understand wine.
David Štegner (14 months ago)
Chateau Valtice brings activities for the whole family. We recommend a nice walk through whole Lednice-Valtice grounds.
Martin Hanzel (15 months ago)
Nice one. I would recommend to all who are shocked by crowds in Lednice. Just drive 6 more kilometers. However the final impression always depends on the level of the guide.
Svetla Hristova (15 months ago)
A beautiful castle and a herb garden. Though it was hot, in the herb garden was nice to stay. Be prepared to wear slippers in the castle through the whole tour.
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