The Chateau Valtice belonged to Liechtenstein family from 1387 until 1945. There is one hundred impressive rooms in the four-wing building of the Chateau Valtice. The tour of the Baroque residence, surrounding park and a wine bar in the neighborhood takes at least half a day, and it is accessible only seventeen rooms! The furniture is in the Baroque and Rococo style and it creates a perfect imagine of a life of the rich noblemen in the 17th and 18th century.

In Valtice, there was originally a castle. Its owners was often changed, e.g. it was the legacy of six daughters of a nobleman, or other times it was divided among the three families. The third wife of John I. of Liechtenstein, Elizabeth, gained an one-sixth of the inheritance of the Chateau Valtice in the second half of the 14th century. Elizabeth bequeathed her share to her husband and so the Liechtenstein family acquired the chateau, which became a basis of a huge estate (30,000 ha), that the Liechtenstein family built and managed until the end of the Second World War.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

B Lee (20 months ago)
One of the best places to visit in Czech Republic. Well worth the trip getting there. They have an English tour though abbreviated.... this place needs handheld audio tour in English.
Dave Harper (21 months ago)
nice place. I likes the tour of the castle normally those are boring but here it was interesting not too long and not too short. while waiting for the tour there are places to stay like the chocolate bar which I fully recommend. only downside is that presentation in different languages was available via internet and did not find there WiFi. when you are foreigner and require different language then most probably you are in data roaming so they should rethink their strategy. also the cashier could learn at least few common phrases in english just to provide better service.
Zlata GERGELOVA (2 years ago)
It seems to be a lovely castle but it was already closing when we came there at 17h. The cashier was unfortunatelg very unfriendly.
Ravi Tokas (2 years ago)
Pretty big castle. But currently construction is going on. Also remember that in November it's only open on Saturday and Sundays (11am-4pm) and in December it's closed. Try to visit it in summer only
Peter Gerberi (2 years ago)
Very nice place. Huge park. Need more care. But evidently they try the best. Can imagine how much could it cost. Home of Moravian vinery.
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