The Capuchin Crypt in Brno is a funeral room mainly for Capuchin friars. The crypt was founded in the mid-17th century in the basement of the Capuchin Monastery in the historical centre of Brno. The bodies of people buried there turned into mummies because of the geological composition of the ground and the system of airing.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Czech Republic

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Muruato (3 years ago)
Such a moving experience. Walked in to a totally empty museum and soaked it all in. The place was easy to find and it’s just steps away from the main train station.
Richard L. Hofmann (3 years ago)
Crazy place. Loved it. It is Erie with all the bones. The cost of admission is not expensive and we'll worth it. I would recommend this attraction.
Meelis Brikker (3 years ago)
Eerie and interesting place, offering a small glimpse into the lives and deaths of Capuchin monks. A true Memento mori - a fascinating reminder of our mortality. Clean and well presented information tablets and exhibits. Might be a bit too much for children and those faint of heart as most of the rooms contain one or more mummified bodies.
andres sarabia (3 years ago)
Instructive display about death practices from the late middle ages to the baroque. They have the fortunate practice of displaying not just the corpses but also their names and stories. Not so fortunate was the display of copies of frescoes instead of the real thing. They also host a beautiful library but it's not open for visits.
John Anderson (3 years ago)
Really interesting displays of different stages of decomposition. Great look into the history of the churches in the town, I wouldn't bring little kids here because some of the bodies faces are really scary due to wide open mouths and eye sockets. Cheap tickets and friendly staff. Would definitely be amongst the coolest thing's we've seen in Czech.
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