The first historical record of Lednice locality dates from 1222. At that time there stood a Gothic fort with courtyard, which was lent by Czech King Václav I to Austrian nobleman Sigfried Sirotek in 1249.

At the end of the 13th century the Liechtensteins, originally from Styria, became holders of all of Lednice and of nearby Mikulov. They gradually acquired land on both sides of the Moravian-Austrian border. Members of the family most often found fame in military service, during the Renaissance they expanded their estates through economic activity. From the middle of the 15th century members of the family occupied the highest offices in the land. However, the family’s position in Moravia really changed under the brothers Karel, Maximilian, and Gundakar of Liechtenstein. Through marriage Karel and Maximilian acquired the great wealth of the old Moravian dynasty of the Černohorskýs of Boskovice. At that time the brothers, like their father and grandfather, were Lutheran, but they soon converted to Catholicism, thus preparing the ground for their rise in politics. Particularly Karel, who served at the court of Emperor Rudolf II, became hetman of Moravia in 1608, and was later raised to princely status by King Matyas II and awarded the Duchy of Opava.

During the revolt of the Czech nobility he stood on the side of the Habsburgs, and took part in the Battle of White Mountain. After the uprising was defeated in 1620 he systematically acquired property confiscated from some of the rebels, and the Liechtensteins became the wealthiest family in Moravia, rising in status above the Žerotíns. Their enormous land holdings brought them great profits, and eventually allowed them to carry out their grandious building projects here in Lednice.

In the 16th century it was probably Hartmann II of Liechtenstein who had the old medieval water castle torn down and replaced with a Renaissance chateau. At the end of the 17th century the chateau was torn down and a Baroque palace was built, with an extensive formal garden, and a massive riding hall designed by Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach that still stands in almost unaltered form.

In the mid-18th century the chateau was again renovated, and in 1815 its front tracts that had been part of the Baroque chateau were removed.

The chateau as it looks today dates from 1846-1858, when Prince Alois II decided that Vienna was not suitable for entertaining in the summer, and had Lednice rebuilt into a summer palace in the spirit of English Gothic. The hall on the ground floor would serve to entertain the European aristocracy at sumptuous banquets, and was furnished with carved wood ceilings, wooden panelling, and select furniture, surpassing anything of its kind in Europe.

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Founded: 1846-1858
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pavel Radkovsky (4 months ago)
A very nice place for a family trip. Very nice gardens suitable for a short walk.
Husrav Turdiev (6 months ago)
Great place to visit during summer time. Nice gardens spend time with kids.
Zlata GERGELOVA (7 months ago)
The gardens, castle and greenhouse are amazing and beautiful piece of architecture. Unfortunately the guided tour is in Czech only and English version is only printed. No audio English guide..so I tried to translate simultaneously what the Czech pregnant guide was saying to my friend in a very low voice. Unfortunately she was quite rude and came to me saying in an unfriendly way that I am not allowed to do this since it disturbs her.
Martin Polak (9 months ago)
We spent a nice day there and were on the main tour inside the castle. It's worth the visit, I would recommend it also for families with small children. Walk in the park to the minaret was also very nice and quiet.
Stephen Nosalik (9 months ago)
This is an amazing complex with stunning grounds and gardens that by itself make it 5 stars. Nothing really beats these manicured and well kept and free gardens. The chateau is open for further exploration for a fee.
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