According to legend, the castle Veveří was founded by Duke Conrad of Brno in the middle of the 11th century. Nevertheless, the first written mention about the castle is from the years 1213 and 1222, when King Přemysl Otakar I used the fortified castle as a prison for rebellious peers. Initially, it was apparently a wooden or masonry residence situated near the Romanesque church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary west of the present compound. In the 1220s a stone castle on the extremity of the rocky promontory behind a deep moat cut out of the rock started to grow. The keep is the only structure which has remained well-preserved from this oldest building stage.

King John of Bohemia pledged the castle to nobleman Jan of Vartemberk in 1311, but his son, Margrave of Moravia Charles (later Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV), received the property as a debt settlement in 1335. Charles´ younger brother, Margrave Jan Jindřich, then took a fancy for Veveří Castle. He was responsible for the building of its rear part with two towers and an outer ward. In the central area around the keep, he developed the main palace, which included a large hall and the chapel. The present appearance of the compound is the result of these building activities, giving the castle its basic silhouette of a medieval fortress.

The castle was a military-civic centre around a manor until the Hussite Wars. During the Hussite wars, Emperor Sigismund positioned mercenary forces of his son-in-law, Albrecht of Austria, around the castle, but he later pledged it to local nobleman Petr Kutěj in 1424. The Hussites besieged the castle in vain during the years 1428-1432. During the second half of the 15th century, the castle was rented by Przemyslaus II of Těšín, who decided to reinforce the castle with the construction of surrounding walls. In 1468, King of Hungary and antiking of Bohemia Matthias Corvinus started his occupation of the castle.

In 1645, the Swedish Army laid siege to Veveří Castle, but their attack was unsuccessful, as the castle was well guarded and the defenders well armed.

When the House of Sinzendorf (1707–1804) acquired the castle, an extensive reconstruction was made, and since that time, the exterior structure of the castle has remained practically unchanged. In 1742, the Prussian Army, having gained entry by the treachery of the castle steward, pillaged the interior of the estate.

Number of noteworthy renovations and reconstructions were carried out in the 1990s and since 2002 the castle is again open to the public.

The former Gothic chapel of St. Prokopius in the palace, which originally extended vertically from the ground floor to the second, was replaced in the late 19th century with separate spaces on the ground floor and a library and administrative spaces on the second floor. A preliminary plan has been developed for the reconstruction of the chapel.

Beyond the palace one proceeds through a courtyard, which was created in the early 19th century by pulling down two 13th-century royal palaces. Luckily, records remain of the appearance of these palaces. Beyond the courtyard lies the so-called English Wing, constructed in the second half of the 17th centiry in the corridor between the Gothic calls. The ground floor served to park horse carriages, while the first floor was used as an armory and later as a granary. The building stands in need of extensive and costly renovation. Yet further along is found the so-called Backyard Palace, erected in the 17th century with two valuted rooms, one above the other. The renovation plans call for it to be made into a space for cultural events.

At the southeastern conrner of the castle stands the so-called Eastern Prismatic Tower, built in the 14th century to protect the castle area from the east. South of this tower archaeological remains have been uncovered of walls of a medieval Eastern Castle Palace, which probably dates from the late 15th century and was pulled down before the mid-17th century.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivana Anděl (21 months ago)
This castle has been neglected for many decades and it is clearly visible. But let's take it from the beginning. We arrived via the Brno water reservoir on a boat that is a part of the city public transport and runs every day. The view from the boat was impressive and promising. After a short walk we arrived at the castle where from close we realised that the castle is still in a really bad condition. The few improvements that has been done seemed very insensitive and VERY badly done. We then paid 30kc to get into the the castle complex and to be able to reach the main ticket office and buy a ticket for the castle tour itself. The tour was sad. There's hardly anything from the original interior left, the rooms have 1950s decor on the walls and on top of those are hung paintings with holes! Apart of this pitiful tour, you can pay and visit several other expositions, including one with a repro of the the medieval Madona of Veveří. There are a few kiosks selling mostly deep fried stuff and a wine shop in the complex. Overall, the place has a communist era feel for me and I think it would do much better to present itself as such rather than pretend to be something that has been irreversibly lost.
Elvi Mataj (21 months ago)
Beautiful place. I came here with the ferry it was all worth it!
Michelle D (2 years ago)
Lovely castle with a museum and a beautiful large courtyard, you can climb up to the castle walls and get a wonderful view of the valley. The castle is partly closed due to its almost ruined walls, but a certain part is open to the public with the original furniture and artwork. The visitors can get refreshments in a small restaurant inside the castle grounds and also taste the local wines in the castle winery. It's very conveniently located a couple of minutes drive from Brno and easily accessible from the Brno reservoir by boat operated by the Brno transportation company making it a great place to include in the boating trip. Great for children and adults, you can take your pet as well. It hosts many cultural activities and events during the summer time. Closed for the winter.
Maik Kalas (2 years ago)
Reachable by boat... It's October and still boats working. Also with bus 303 from Zoo. Or by walking about 10km on a fantastic trail next to Lake and the river. Next to the castle is the bridge, definatelly visit for a great opportunity for photography. Check the opening hours cause you may be disappointed
Adriano Bortoleto (2 years ago)
It is a very old castle and they could restore it to make it more attractive. But the place around is amazing, nature and good air. The place is much better when they are celebrating something. Last time I want there they had a Greek event, with typical food, music, dancing. Etc
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