The Alatskivi Manor (Allatskiwwi in German) was first mentioned in 1601. In 1628 Swedish king Gustav Adolf II donated it as a gift to his secretary Johan Adler Salviusele. In 1642 the manor was further passed into the possession of Hans Dettermann Cronmann and in 1753 it was bought by Otto Heinrich von Stackelberg.

The present huge castle manor was designed by the land owner Arved von Nolcken. He had travelled in Scotland and fascinated to the Balmoral Castle. Von Nolcken wanted to build a copy of royal castle to Alatskivi. The new neo-Gothic main building was completed in 1885 and it was one of the most luxurious manor houses in Estonia.

At present, the building is owned by Alatskivi Community and being restored to serve as a museum and restaurant.

Reference: Visit Tartu

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Address

Lossi 1, Alatskivi, Estonia
See all sites in Alatskivi

Details

Founded: 1880-1885
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ronnie Tidy (11 months ago)
Beautiful castle & its garden, the museum is small but well laid out. We went in late October, it was off season, the restaurant was closed but everything was in beautiful autumn colours.
Riho Randla (Martell) (14 months ago)
Very nice castle with good service and tasty food. Interesting entertainment could be found there, like concerts and spectacles. Not too pricey.
Kristiina Toom (14 months ago)
Very nice experience. Recommend staying a night or two, very comfortable, private, beautiful!
farmakeros farmakeros (14 months ago)
Nice buildind. It worths to see it from the outside. Near the castle you can freely park your car.
Ain Mihkelson (15 months ago)
Nice place with good atmosphere and overview of the birth and renovation of the castle. Local handmade products available in shops around the castle.
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