Notre Dame de Mantes

Mantes-la-Jolie, France

The medieval Collegiate Church of Our Lady of Mantes is a large and historically important Catholic church constructed between c.1155 and 1350. Its grandeur, its quirky design and its strong associations with the Capetian dynasty make the church particularly interesting to architectural historians.

Construction of the present church began some time between 1155 and 1170, funded by income from the Commune and by the generous support of the Crown. Building work started with the raising and reinforcing of the ground along the north of the site, where the land slopes steeply down to the river. The design was on a grand scale but with a relatively simple plan, initially featuring neither transepts nor radiating chapels (though the latter were added later). The nave was completed up to the gallery vault level by around 1190. The high vaults were in place by around 1200 with the roof completed by 1240. The western facade was completed up to the base of the towers some time before 1225. The western towers are mainly 13th century work, except for the upper parts of the north tower, which was only completed in the late 15th century. Both towers had become dangerously unstable by the mid 19th century and were substantially rebuilt to a simpler design by the local architect Alphonse Durand. Its proximity to a strategic river crossing meant that the church was at the centre of heavy aerial bombardment following the allied invasion of France in 1944. In spite of this the church survived WWII relatively unscathed, even though most of the surrounding town was flattened.

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Details

Founded: c. 1155
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martine Yhuellou (20 months ago)
Lieu idéal pour se recueillir pour écouter la musique . Il y a des orgues magnifiques. Nous avons de la chance d avoir un tel monument dans notre ville. Elle a traversée les temps et nous survivra pendant encore longtemps. On ne peut que rendre hommage à ceux qui l ont bâtie. Venez la visitée. Y mettre un cierge est apaisant. Nous pouvons ainsi envoyer beaucoup d amour autour de nous. Nous en avons besoin.
Julie Clémençon (2 years ago)
Ravissante église collégiale sur les bords de Seine. De style gothique, élégants jeux de lumière au travers des vitraux. Je conseille également la tour à proximité.
Максим Саржин (2 years ago)
Super
joubert marie claude (2 years ago)
Majesté. C'est le mot qui vient instinctivement en tête lorsqu'on entre dans cette "simple" église. J'ai rarement été aussi supris par ce que dégageait un lieu et les arts qu'il abritait. Vraiment un endroit magnifique.
Steven Villarreal (4 years ago)
Beautiful church !!
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