Versailles Cathedral

Versailles, France

Versailles Cathedral is a Roman Catholic cathedral and national monument of France. It is the seat of the Bishop of Versailles, created as a constitutional bishopric in 1790 and confirmed by the Concordat of 1801.

The cathedral was built as the parish church of Saint Louis before becoming the cathedral of the new diocese. The building is of the mid-18th century: the first stone was laid, by Louis XV in 1743 and the church was consecrated in 1754. The architect was Jacques Hardouin-Mansart de Sagonne (1711-1778), a grandson of the famous architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart. In 1764 Louis-François Trouard added the Chapelle des Catéchismes to the northern transept.

During the French Revolution it was used as a Temple of Abundance, and badly defaced.

It was chosen and used as the cathedral by the post-Revolutionary bishop, who preferred it to the church of Notre-Dame in Versailles, which had been the choice of the preceding constitutional bishop. Its consecration as a cathedral was however severely delayed, and was not performed until 1843, by the diocese's third bishop, Louis-Marie-Edmond Blanquart de Bailleul.

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Details

Founded: 1743-1754
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valli M (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, pleasant place
B M (2 years ago)
Perfect Cathedral.
Mike Mccrossin (2 years ago)
So beautiful...
Zhengrong Zhang (3 years ago)
It was free to enter, and I was totally amazed by what I saw. I can't recommend it enough. Truly beautiful place.
Drona Nagarajan (3 years ago)
Old 17th century cathedral. Good food scene around.
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