Versailles Cathedral

Versailles, France

Versailles Cathedral is a Roman Catholic cathedral and national monument of France. It is the seat of the Bishop of Versailles, created as a constitutional bishopric in 1790 and confirmed by the Concordat of 1801.

The cathedral was built as the parish church of Saint Louis before becoming the cathedral of the new diocese. The building is of the mid-18th century: the first stone was laid, by Louis XV in 1743 and the church was consecrated in 1754. The architect was Jacques Hardouin-Mansart de Sagonne (1711-1778), a grandson of the famous architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart. In 1764 Louis-François Trouard added the Chapelle des Catéchismes to the northern transept.

During the French Revolution it was used as a Temple of Abundance, and badly defaced.

It was chosen and used as the cathedral by the post-Revolutionary bishop, who preferred it to the church of Notre-Dame in Versailles, which had been the choice of the preceding constitutional bishop. Its consecration as a cathedral was however severely delayed, and was not performed until 1843, by the diocese's third bishop, Louis-Marie-Edmond Blanquart de Bailleul.

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Founded: 1743-1754
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tro Lala (16 months ago)
A nice place to have a walk and do some sketching or just sit down and enjoy (hopefully) a good weather.
Foteini Paschalidou (17 months ago)
Its a worth-visit monument in one of the oldest neigborhoods in Versailles.
Marc Aurèle (2 years ago)
Situated in a quiet district of Versailles, here is this huge & renovated cathedral with golden domes and a vast forecourt. Worth going there just for the architecture and the restaurants nearby... Less than a 15 minute walk from the Château.
will5202 (2 years ago)
Nice cathedral though nothing special about it although it does host activities every once in a while
Fabian Bergeron (2 years ago)
Cathédrale Saint Louis is Versailles' biggest church and only cathedral, completed in 18th century. It is still actively used for services, entry is free.
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