Villa Savoye is a modernist villa in Poissy, in the outskirts of Paris. It was designed by Swiss architects Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, and built between 1928 and 1931 using reinforced concrete.

A manifesto of Le Corbusier's 'five points' of new architecture, the villa is representative of the bases of modern architecture, and is one of the most easily recognizable and renowned examples of the International style.

The house was originally built as a country retreat on behest of the Savoye family. After being purchased by the neighbouring school it passed on to be property of the French state in 1958, and after surviving several plans of demolition, it was designated as an official French historical monument in 1965 (a rare occurrence, as Le Corbusier was still living at the time). It was thoroughly renovated from 1985 to 1997 and is now open to visitors year-round.

In July 2016, the house and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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Founded: 1928-1931
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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eduardo Haddad (47 days ago)
Very nice construction with impressive architecture.
Madame Thermomix (2 months ago)
Superb architecture by Le Corbusier in a once-pastoral, now urban setting. Wonderfully practical house with a lovely view over the Seine valley. Don't be surprised, the address takes you to a Lycée (high school); there's a metal grilled gate to the far right of the property! One of my favourite visits in a while.
Kenneth Peeters (4 months ago)
This is a must do for every aspiring architect. This house is a beautiful example of early modernism. Thoug many parts of the house feel outdated nowadays, you still feel its relevance and influence on modern day architecture. The only thing I was missing was contemporary furniture from the appropriate Era it was build in. Even though the entrance fee is a little expensive for a bunch of empty rooms, a visit still has value for its influence.
Emily F (8 months ago)
Must see for architects visiting the area. Knowing the plans and drawings is one thing but experiencing the architectural promenade is something else. Fantastic tour given in English, the guide was really knowledgeable but also managed to communicate the main design principles to everyone clearly
Thomas Miller (9 months ago)
This little gem is well worth the trip from Paris if you are interested in modern architecture. It's in a quiet spot surrounded by gardens and is not usually busy. A perfect spot to spend an hour or so in contemplation.
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Church of Our Lady before Týn

The Church of Our Lady before Týn is a dominant feature of the Old Town of Prague and has been the main church of this part of the city since the 14th century. The church's towers are 80 m high and topped by four small spires.

In the 11th century, this area was occupied by a Romanesque church, which was built there for foreign merchants coming to the nearby Týn Courtyard. Later it was replaced by an early Gothic Church of Our Lady before Týn in 1256. Construction of the present church began in the 14th century in the late Gothic style under the influence of Matthias of Arras and later Peter Parler. By the beginning of the 15th century, construction was almost complete; only the towers, the gable and roof were missing. The church was controlled by Hussites for two centuries, including John of Rokycan, future archbishop of Prague, who became the church's vicar in 1427. The roof was completed in the 1450s, while the gable and northern tower were completed shortly thereafter during the reign of George of Poděbrady (1453–1471). His sculpture was placed on the gable, below a huge golden chalice, the symbol of the Hussites. The southern tower was not completed until 1511, under architect Matěj Rejsek.

After the lost Battle of White Mountain (1620) began the era of harsh recatholicisation (part of the Counter-Reformation). Consequently, the sculptures of 'heretic king' George of Poděbrady and the chalice were removed in 1626 and replaced by a sculpture of the Virgin Mary, with a giant halo made from by melting down the chalice. In 1679 the church was struck by lightning, and the subsequent fire heavily damaged the old vault, which was later replaced by a lower baroque vault.

Renovation works carried out in 1876–1895 were later reversed during extensive exterior renovation works in the years 1973–1995. Interior renovation is still in progress.

The northern portal is a wonderful example of Gothic sculpture from the Parler workshop, with a relief depicting the Crucifixion. The main entrance is located on the church's western face, through a narrow passage between the houses in front of the church.

The early baroque altarpiece has paintings by Karel Škréta from around 1649. The oldest pipe organ in Prague stands inside this church. The organ was built in 1673 by Heinrich Mundt and is one of the most representative 17th-century organs in Europe.