Villa Savoye is a modernist villa in Poissy, in the outskirts of Paris. It was designed by Swiss architects Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, and built between 1928 and 1931 using reinforced concrete.

A manifesto of Le Corbusier's 'five points' of new architecture, the villa is representative of the bases of modern architecture, and is one of the most easily recognizable and renowned examples of the International style.

The house was originally built as a country retreat on behest of the Savoye family. After being purchased by the neighbouring school it passed on to be property of the French state in 1958, and after surviving several plans of demolition, it was designated as an official French historical monument in 1965 (a rare occurrence, as Le Corbusier was still living at the time). It was thoroughly renovated from 1985 to 1997 and is now open to visitors year-round.

In July 2016, the house and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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Founded: 1928-1931
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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eduardo Haddad (10 months ago)
Very nice construction with impressive architecture.
Madame Thermomix (11 months ago)
Superb architecture by Le Corbusier in a once-pastoral, now urban setting. Wonderfully practical house with a lovely view over the Seine valley. Don't be surprised, the address takes you to a Lycée (high school); there's a metal grilled gate to the far right of the property! One of my favourite visits in a while.
Kenneth Peeters (2 years ago)
This is a must do for every aspiring architect. This house is a beautiful example of early modernism. Thoug many parts of the house feel outdated nowadays, you still feel its relevance and influence on modern day architecture. The only thing I was missing was contemporary furniture from the appropriate Era it was build in. Even though the entrance fee is a little expensive for a bunch of empty rooms, a visit still has value for its influence.
Emily F (2 years ago)
Must see for architects visiting the area. Knowing the plans and drawings is one thing but experiencing the architectural promenade is something else. Fantastic tour given in English, the guide was really knowledgeable but also managed to communicate the main design principles to everyone clearly
Thomas Miller (2 years ago)
This little gem is well worth the trip from Paris if you are interested in modern architecture. It's in a quiet spot surrounded by gardens and is not usually busy. A perfect spot to spend an hour or so in contemplation.
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