Vaux-de-Cernay Abbey

Cernay-la-Ville, France

Vaux-de-Cernay Abbey was founded in 1118 when Simon de Neauffle and his wife Eve donated the land for this foundation to the monks of Savigny Abbey, in order to have a monastery built in honour of the Mother of God and Saint John the Baptist. Vital, Abbot of Savigny, accepted their offer, and sent a group of monks under the direction of Arnaud, who became their first abbot. Besides the founders, others of the nobility came to the aid of the new Savigniac community.

As soon as the abbey was well established, many postulants were admitted, thus making possible in 1137 the foundation of Le Breuil-Benoît Abbey in the Diocese of Evreux. In 1148 Vaux-de-Cernay, together with the entire Congregation of Savigny, entered the Order of Cîteaux and became an affiliation of Clairvaux Abbey. From this time on they prospered, building a church in the simple Cistercian style. Over time, additional buildings were constructed, as well as a mill, and a fish farm.

Many of its abbots became well known. Andrew, the fourth, died as Bishop of Arras. Guy of Vaux-de-Cernay, the sixth, was delegated by the General Chapter to accompany the Fourth Crusade in 1203. Three years later he was one of the principal figures in the Albigensian Crusade, which fought against the Cathars. In recognition of his service he was made Bishop of Carcassonne (1211) and is commemorated in the Cistercian Menology. His nephew Peter of Vaux-de-Cernay, also a monk of the abbey, accompanied him on this crusade, and left a chronicle of the Cathars and the war against them.

It was under Thomas, Peter's successor, that Porrois Abbey, a Cistercian nunnery, later renamed the Abbey of Port-Royal, was founded and placed under the direction of the abbots of Vaux-de-Cernay. The ninth abbot, Thibault de Marley (1235-47), a descendant of the Montmorency family, was canonized.

Towards the end of the fourteenth century the monastery began losing its fervour, both on account of its wealth and because of the disturbed state of the Île-de-France during the Hundred Years' War. After the introduction of commendatory abbots in 1542 there was little left of the monastic community beyond the name. In the seventeenth century the community was restored in spirit by embracing the Reform of the Strict Observance as promoted by Denis Largentier. During this time the commendatory abbot was John Casimir, King of Poland. The monastery was suppressed in 1791 during the French Revolution and its members (twelve priests) were dispersed.

The buildings, after passing through various hands, were partly restored after the site was bought by Charlotte de Rothschild in the 1880s, who saved the ruins of the church and part of the buildings, fully restoring the abbey.

Today the buildings are used as a hotel with a capacity for 1,200 persons, complete with restaurant and heliport, but still using the nearby spring as the monks did centuries before.

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Details

Founded: 1118
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Léa Benveniste (15 months ago)
The restaurant is great and in a beautiful place. The abbey is majestic and the parc is really nice on a sunny day.
Léa Benveniste (15 months ago)
The restaurant is great and in a beautiful place. The abbey is majestic and the parc is really nice on a sunny day.
DameFairy (15 months ago)
We were not staying at the hotel, just only passed by for a visit and had a cup of coffee. At first we only wanted to see the abbey but it turned out that the whole space is very beautiful, we had a long walk all over the place, the abbey, the hotel and around the lake. It was very peaceful and we ended up having a lovely afternoon. It’s unexpected.
DameFairy (15 months ago)
We were not staying at the hotel, just only passed by for a visit and had a cup of coffee. At first we only wanted to see the abbey but it turned out that the whole space is very beautiful, we had a long walk all over the place, the abbey, the hotel and around the lake. It was very peaceful and we ended up having a lovely afternoon. It’s unexpected.
Joan Delmas (18 months ago)
Just had an amazing late afternoon walk on this abbaye with my treasures. It was father's day and we decided to go out even it's already late so we can just bond together. This place was just amazing and beautiful. Felt like I was in the scottish villages. We were enjoying the view, it was truly relaxing. I highly recommend for families. You can even dine here, it was lovely the terrasse. Do check it guys, you'll love it!
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