Vaux-de-Cernay Abbey

Cernay-la-Ville, France

Vaux-de-Cernay Abbey was founded in 1118 when Simon de Neauffle and his wife Eve donated the land for this foundation to the monks of Savigny Abbey, in order to have a monastery built in honour of the Mother of God and Saint John the Baptist. Vital, Abbot of Savigny, accepted their offer, and sent a group of monks under the direction of Arnaud, who became their first abbot. Besides the founders, others of the nobility came to the aid of the new Savigniac community.

As soon as the abbey was well established, many postulants were admitted, thus making possible in 1137 the foundation of Le Breuil-Benoît Abbey in the Diocese of Evreux. In 1148 Vaux-de-Cernay, together with the entire Congregation of Savigny, entered the Order of Cîteaux and became an affiliation of Clairvaux Abbey. From this time on they prospered, building a church in the simple Cistercian style. Over time, additional buildings were constructed, as well as a mill, and a fish farm.

Many of its abbots became well known. Andrew, the fourth, died as Bishop of Arras. Guy of Vaux-de-Cernay, the sixth, was delegated by the General Chapter to accompany the Fourth Crusade in 1203. Three years later he was one of the principal figures in the Albigensian Crusade, which fought against the Cathars. In recognition of his service he was made Bishop of Carcassonne (1211) and is commemorated in the Cistercian Menology. His nephew Peter of Vaux-de-Cernay, also a monk of the abbey, accompanied him on this crusade, and left a chronicle of the Cathars and the war against them.

It was under Thomas, Peter's successor, that Porrois Abbey, a Cistercian nunnery, later renamed the Abbey of Port-Royal, was founded and placed under the direction of the abbots of Vaux-de-Cernay. The ninth abbot, Thibault de Marley (1235-47), a descendant of the Montmorency family, was canonized.

Towards the end of the fourteenth century the monastery began losing its fervour, both on account of its wealth and because of the disturbed state of the Île-de-France during the Hundred Years' War. After the introduction of commendatory abbots in 1542 there was little left of the monastic community beyond the name. In the seventeenth century the community was restored in spirit by embracing the Reform of the Strict Observance as promoted by Denis Largentier. During this time the commendatory abbot was John Casimir, King of Poland. The monastery was suppressed in 1791 during the French Revolution and its members (twelve priests) were dispersed.

The buildings, after passing through various hands, were partly restored after the site was bought by Charlotte de Rothschild in the 1880s, who saved the ruins of the church and part of the buildings, fully restoring the abbey.

Today the buildings are used as a hotel with a capacity for 1,200 persons, complete with restaurant and heliport, but still using the nearby spring as the monks did centuries before.

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Details

Founded: 1118
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ekaterina Ivleva (3 months ago)
The old abbey is beautiful. However, not many things to do except eating and/or watching the abbey.
Olivier Ruff (4 months ago)
Just one word: magnificent! The place is just marvelous and the food ... well ... magnificent. Take your time enjoying the ride to the place, take your time walking around, take your time enjoying a meal you'll remember.
Renaud EB (5 months ago)
A beautiful hotel, amazing countryside. But a little bit expensive when the summer heat is not compensated by the air-con. The restaurant is good but not enough to explain staff solemnity.
Classicdriver 1800S (5 months ago)
One of my favorite area for driving classic cars between Cernay-la-ville and Senlisse, the scenery is magnificent and protected for kilometers. Take a break here in the historical surroundings of the ruins of the Abbey, the gardens and the lake, have a tea. You should be able to enter with your car if you are a restaurant visitor otherwise parc entry is charged.
Adam Swadling (7 months ago)
Great place to stay, amazingly beautiful grounds with nice rooms. Food was amazing but the staff were impeccable in their service. Incredibly helpful and friendly people
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