Archangel Michael's Church

Znojmo, Czech Republic

Archangel Michael's Church was built in the 12th century for the newcomers who were settling down in the neighbourhood of Znojmo Castle. The consecration to Archangel Michael and the location on the highest point of Znojmo seem to imply that this church might have replaced an ancient pagan occult place. However, the medieval history of the church does not seem to be free from dramatic events: in the early-15th century the Hussites bombed the church so it had to be built anew. In the 16th century Lutheran preachers got hold of it, when the church tower collapsed for the first time (1581). In 1624 the Jesuits took over the ravaged place and rebuilt it. In 1642 the church tower collapsed for the second time, not to be built again as part of the church structure. In 1852 they built a new tower separately from the church.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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