Geras Abbey is a Premonstratensian monastery founded in 1153 as a daughter house of Seelau Abbey by Ekbert and Ulrich of Pernegg. It was and settled by canons from Seelau. Geras Abbey was able to survive the reforms of the Emperor Joseph II and the consequent monastery closures of 1783, and remains in operation to this day.

The abbey church is a Romanesque basilica which was reworked in the Baroque style in the 18th century by the architect Josef Munggenast and the fresco painter Paul Troger. Today the abbey is often used as a venue for classical music recitals.

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Address

Hauptstraße 1, Geras, Austria
See all sites in Geras

Details

Founded: 1153
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

gerald oppeck (6 months ago)
Sehenswertes Stift, außergewöhnliche Patres, meine Hochachtung
Werner Röder (9 months ago)
Sehenswerte Stiftsanlage; wir hatten eine sehr gut gemachte Führung
Harald Mitterhofer (10 months ago)
Kulturhistorisch absolut einen Besuch wert. Tolle und bedeutende Klosteranlage mit unschätzbarem EInfluss auf die Kultur des Umlandes. Mir persönlich fällt es schwer, dabei die in ferner und naher Vergangenheit begangenen Verbrechen, die untrennbar mit so einer Institution verbunden sind, zu vergessen.
Christian Ender (10 months ago)
Schöner Platz mit absolut sehenswerter Stiftskirche. Beim Abfischen der Karpfenteiche gewinnt man interessante Einblicke in die Teichwirtschaft.
Elisabeth Dietrich (10 months ago)
Es war sehr schön und interessant. die Führung des Stiftes war sehr gut gestaltet und sehr gut erklärt die Kirche ist sehenswert und sehr prunkvoll, ich kann jeden empfehlen eine Führung zu machen.
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