Geras Abbey is a Premonstratensian monastery founded in 1153 as a daughter house of Seelau Abbey by Ekbert and Ulrich of Pernegg. It was and settled by canons from Seelau. Geras Abbey was able to survive the reforms of the Emperor Joseph II and the consequent monastery closures of 1783, and remains in operation to this day.

The abbey church is a Romanesque basilica which was reworked in the Baroque style in the 18th century by the architect Josef Munggenast and the fresco painter Paul Troger. Today the abbey is often used as a venue for classical music recitals.

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Address

Hauptstraße 1, Geras, Austria
See all sites in Geras

Details

Founded: 1153
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

gerald oppeck (4 years ago)
Sehenswertes Stift, außergewöhnliche Patres, meine Hochachtung
Werner Röder (5 years ago)
Sehenswerte Stiftsanlage; wir hatten eine sehr gut gemachte Führung
Harald Mitterhofer (5 years ago)
Kulturhistorisch absolut einen Besuch wert. Tolle und bedeutende Klosteranlage mit unschätzbarem EInfluss auf die Kultur des Umlandes. Mir persönlich fällt es schwer, dabei die in ferner und naher Vergangenheit begangenen Verbrechen, die untrennbar mit so einer Institution verbunden sind, zu vergessen.
Christian Ender (5 years ago)
Schöner Platz mit absolut sehenswerter Stiftskirche. Beim Abfischen der Karpfenteiche gewinnt man interessante Einblicke in die Teichwirtschaft.
Elisabeth Dietrich (5 years ago)
Es war sehr schön und interessant. die Führung des Stiftes war sehr gut gestaltet und sehr gut erklärt die Kirche ist sehenswert und sehr prunkvoll, ich kann jeden empfehlen eine Führung zu machen.
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Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.