Ducal Rotunda of the Virgin Mary and St Catherine

Znojmo, Czech Republic

The Ducal Rotunda of the Virgin Mary and St Catherine is Znojmo's most valuable monument, and features one of the oldest fresco in the Czech lands. Particular importance of this painting is that besides the religious motives it displays also the praising portrayal of the ruling Přemyslid dynasty.

The painting was commissioned by Konrad II of Znojmo on the occasion of his wedding with Mary, daughter of Uroš of Serbia in 1134. Apart of the donor couple, Konrad and Mary, the identity of the other depicted members of the dynasty is disputed among the historians. With two exceptions being the Přemysl the Ploughman, the legendary ancestor of the dynasty, and Vratislaus I, the first King of Bohemia.

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Details

Founded: 1080s
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iv Gro (22 months ago)
Facilities are closed afer season. However from that point you will see quite stunning viewside
Rafal Wojtowicz (22 months ago)
nice building
Mc Marik (2 years ago)
Closed at time of our visit for no reason :(
Alexander Degtyarev (2 years ago)
Nice view, closes too early.
Birupaksha Ray (2 years ago)
Beautiful picruresque middle-age town.
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